ivy on douglas fir

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by teresa, Nov 14, 2006.

  1. teresa

    teresa Active Member

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    We have purchased a property on Vancouver Island with old growth fir on it. There are ivies growing 2/3 of the way up these huge trees and I wonder if the ivies pose a threat to the Douglas fir and should be removed?
     
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Ultimately, yes, they should be removed both for the sake of the Douglas fir and to remove the (potential) invasive ivy.

    UBCBG has removed almost all of its ivy plants in the past couple years - only a few more to go.
     
  3. HortLine

    HortLine Active Member 10 Years

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    I would like to suggest that you cut the ivy low down and strip out all the growth around the base of the fir. The ivy will gradually die and fall off in time though some of the larger stems will hang on. Then keep that ivy from going up the tree again! It will try its darnedest to reestablish.
    Good luck!
     
  4. teresa

    teresa Active Member

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    Thank you both for your advice. I have cut the ivies at the base of the trees. Some were very prickly 2 1/2" diameter "stems"! I see that the tree's bark has begun to grow around the vines in places but will let nature take it's course now and as you say keep new shoots from climbing.
     
  5. NiftyNiall

    NiftyNiall Active Member 10 Years

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    Cut away a strip of the Ivy 36"/1M. vertically, all the way around the trees. It is best to leave the upper part of the Ivy in place, it will rot away slowly in about three years, this way you do not do any damage to the bark, and it is easier on yourself, but a bit unsightly for a while. I found that a flat crowbar helped to lever the larger vines away from the tree, so that they could be cut much easier.
     

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