Identification: It's all Greek (figs)

Discussion in 'Fruit and Nut Trees' started by KenFromNGa, Oct 2, 2012.

  1. KenFromNGa

    KenFromNGa Member

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    About 7 years ago, while in Athens, Greece, our guide asked if I liked figs. I said I loved figs. He asked if I would like some fig trees from the Acropolis. After I asked him if he was crazy, I said sure. He drove to the fence around the Acropolis, climbed up on his car, and broke off about 10 cuttings of a really large fig tree inside the fence. It was January, so I couldn't see any leaves, but the tree was truly a tree you could climb.
    I brought the cuttings home (didn't get arrested at the airport), and rooted the cuttings. I ended up with three thriving fig trees. This year, about May, they produced a tremendous number of figs; very large, nearly black, red centers, and very tasty, although somewhat stronger flavored than Brown Turkeys. They ripened by the first week of July, and immediately started producing more figs. The second batch didn't fare well and I didn't keep any.
    SO! Large black, red center, early ripening, from the Acropolis. I can't find out what kind they are. I wrote the Acropolis Museum, but they didn't answer. The best I can determine, they may be Vasilika, but I'm not sure. I want to propogate them and share them, but I'd like to tell folks what kind they are.
    Any ideas?
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Unless there is a single dominant cultivar that is effectively the only one grown in the area of collection (and produces fruits like yours) all you can do is continue as you presumably have been, that is comparing photos and descriptions of various kinds until it appears there is one that is exactly the same. Ideally you would locate and vist a collection with live planted specimens (and reliable labeling or planting records!) where you could compare live specimens (using fruit and leaf samples from your trees).
     
  3. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    They are more likely from a self-sown seedling rather than a named cultivar. In which case, an exact equivalent won't exist, apart from the parent tree. You could always name it Ficus carica 'Acropolis' (unless someone else has already had the same idea!).
     
  4. bjo

    bjo Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi,

    you might like to compare it with the zillions of varieties on this site: http://figs4fun.com/

    ...try "Chios-C"

    or ask on their forum.

    good luck...and enjoy!

    Brian
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2012
  5. KenFromNGa

    KenFromNGa Member

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    THAT is a cool idea. Nothing Googles with that name other than your response. Ficus carica Acropolis. I like it.
     
  6. evladi7654

    evladi7654 Member

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    Hi ! I would like to exchange some cuttings with your Greek Fig...? evladi7654@aol.com
     
  7. KenFromNGa

    KenFromNGa Member

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    HI, What would you like to exchange them for?
     
  8. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Use the private messaging system for back-and-forth about exchanges, please.
     

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