It bloomed!

Discussion in 'Orchidaceae (orchids)' started by AromieOrchid, Oct 4, 2009.

  1. AromieOrchid

    AromieOrchid Member

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    Hi everyone, I'm the proud new owner of an orchid that just started to bloom today.

    It was purchased at the UBC Botanical Garden during the plant sale last month.

    Even though my room doesn't get much sunlight, I must be taking good care of it because the first flower opened up :).

    Thanks grandma for teaching me how to take care of plants :)

    Two questions: Does UBC Botanical Garden offer repotting services? And if I take my orchid outside, will it be pollinated even in October?

    Thanks, and some pictures:
     

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  2. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Maybe, but I wouldn't advise it. Too cold. ---As I understand it, flowers wilt immediately after fertilization, so maybe hold off on that is you want to enjoy them for a while.

    What a beautiful orchid! Looks Dendrobium-esque.
     
  3. AromieOrchid

    AromieOrchid Member

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    Thank you very much :). I'll update with some more pictures when it blooms even more. In the first picture, it's kind of hard to see, but there's another bud right in front of the one that bloomed.

    Ah, I didn't realize that. I would leave it out in the sun, and not for too long. When a flower is fertilized, will it produce a seed? I'm not sure it will even work because I don't think there are any other orchids nearby.
     
  4. AromieOrchid

    AromieOrchid Member

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    New pictures a day later:
     

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  5. kevind76

    kevind76 Active Member

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    Yes, it's too cold anywhere in Canada in October to be leaving that type outside. As for pollination, you don't need another orchid, just another flower on the same spike - you could even pollinate it with just one flower. Google it - it's quite fascinating and different from any other plant family! As for seeds, though - if you are successful in pollination, you will get possibly millions of seeds. None will be able to germinate, however, without a sterile agar solution in a flask.
     
  6. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    A.O., there's nothing like a happy blooming orchid to brighten a gloomy day!
    I like your first photo of the most recent group (well, I like 'em all!)---your plant looks as if it is gazing out the window! And the last one is good too, saying hello.
    Beautiful!
     
  7. Katalina25

    Katalina25 New Member

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    Well done!

    Note to self...remember that Botanical has sales lol
     
  8. AromieOrchid

    AromieOrchid Member

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    Thanks for the compliments =).

    kevind~ What do you mean by "another flower on the same spike"? Also, why is an agar solution needed? Those aren't just found in nature, so why would a plant produce seeds that can't survive on their own :?

    I took it outside today for about an hour and a half, and I don't think anything happened. Flower #2 looks like it's going to bloom soon!
     
  9. arcticshaun

    arcticshaun Active Member

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    Congratulations on your orchid flower!
    While cross pollination between plants would have greater chance of genetic diversity, selfings between two flowers on the same plant are not uncommon. Most orchids grown by man are either created from seedlings grown in sterile flasks or sterile meristem culture. If you were to pollinate your flower you could wait several months for the seed pod to mature and then sprinkle the seed around the 'mother' plant. You might get a few seedlings. In nature orchids produce vast numbers of seed with a small percentage developing a symbiotic relationship with a fungus and even fewer surviving on to maturity.
    The main argument for not producing seed on orchids as houseplants is that all the energy of the plant is directed into producing the seed pod as opposed to new growth and flowers. As Dendrobiums grow they usually produce more (and larger) canes as well keikis (babies). Given enough light your plant will put on bigger and bigger floral displays.

    Shaun
     
  10. AromieOrchid

    AromieOrchid Member

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    Thank you Shaun! That is really encouraging. I guess it would be better to not worry about pollinating, then.

    If mine is going to grow bigger, I should probably repot next spring then, right? Also, are orchids supposed to have a scent? I can't smell anything from my flowers, but that's fine with me :)

    *Update with the second blossom!
     

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  11. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Your plant just gets MORE beautiful! Very nice.

    About the fragrance thing: nearly all of my orchids are scentless. Exceptions are my lovely Otaara (cattleya) and an oncidium that has purple flowers that smell of chocolate---I kid you not!
     
  12. AromieOrchid

    AromieOrchid Member

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    toagata~ I consider myself very fortunate. What a joy it is to raise plants! My orchid brightens up my room, for sure.

    What does your Otaara smell like? I know it's difficult to describe scents. A chocolate smell? Wow! Does it make you want to eat chocolate all the time? Hehe.
     
  13. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Yeah, wow. Hard to describe indeed! Subtle yet insistent. Kind of like the reaction I have to the aroma of my sansevieria flowers...I find myself thinking 'Ooh, what a pleasant fragrance!' then realize it's coming from one of my plants! Jeez, this must sound really dopey, but it's a whole different olfactory experience from, say, a shot of aerosol air 'freshener'. Delicate. If only I COULD put essence of Otaara (her name is Jane) in a perfume!

    As for the chocolate---y'know, I think that chocolate-liking is one of those genetic traits. Either have it or you don't, like spelling ability or musical aptitude. Me, I can take or leave chocolate. Eh! However, my daughter is a different pot o'cocoa. Have caught her inhaling the oncidium aura when it was in bloom before, and it's getting ready to do so again. Look out!
     
  14. 2annbrow

    2annbrow Active Member

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    Hi, togata! Maybe it, the consuming [ouch! I warned you about my puns!] desire for chocolate, also depends on the genes of the particular chocolate too! I've always been addicted to dark chocolate, but don't bother with milk chocolate at all.
    It's funny about scents. I have some German chamomile that smells like pineapple to me, but my friend Geneva says "Ugh! Smells like cats' pee!"
    But anyway, if vanilla comes from an orchid, why couldn't a chocolate smell too? By the way, is anyone growing a vanilla orchid?
     
  15. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Another plant on my 'wish I had one' list. Also Angraecum.

    Well, I daresay you will get some remarks from folks in re. where chocolate comes from (cacao)---but I like your thought! Why not indeed.
    I have a dear friend who has a tendresse for dark chocolate. Likes more mundane varieties, but esp. dark with "things" in it, such as fruit, nuts, etc. My daughter is a purist: milk chocolate with NO "THINGS". Even as a little kid she could detect the presence of the most minute amount of objects in her chocolate, or anything else. My son is like me---neutral.

    I have wondered if there is a connection between liking for dark chocolate and liking for other spicy things, e.g. hot sauce. The aforementioned friend LOVES hot sauces of all kinds on all kinds of food. Well, my theory needs more work, because I really like hot sauce, mustard, horseradish, but am not enthusiastic about dark chocolate.

    OK...I'll quit now!
     
  16. MrsGreenthumbs

    MrsGreenthumbs Active Member

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    So Pretty!!! :) :)
     
  17. AromieOrchid

    AromieOrchid Member

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    mrsgreenthumbs~ Yay! Thanks!

    Hehe, nice discussion. I looove chocolate of all kinds! I actually like chocolate with nuts, but no fruit fillings of any kind (like Purdy's has).

    :) I'm so impatient to grow up and have kids. I hope I'll be a good mom!

    Oh, I forgot vanilla comes from orchids! Neat!
     
  18. PennyG

    PennyG Active Member

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    Very pretty, well done.
     
  19. AromieOrchid

    AromieOrchid Member

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    Thanks Penny. It's cute, small, and manageable right now. I wonder how big it will eventually grow?..!
     
  20. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Depends on the variety. Some stay small---some get HUGE!
    D'you know the specific name (genus, species, variety) of yours? I've been thinking of it as a Dendrobium, but is it?
     
  21. kevind76

    kevind76 Active Member

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    It is a Dendrobium. Dendrobium phalaenopsis and/or biggibum is in the background. Hard to tell from the photo, but is it in a 4" pot? How big is the flower? Depending on the exact breeding, the canes (growths) can stay just like they are, and not get any bigger, or grow to be 2' or more. Looks to me like the compact kind. They like warm temps, lots of light, and make sure the roots get to dry out a bit between waterings. I like these kinds. Good luck with it.
     
  22. AromieOrchid

    AromieOrchid Member

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    Ah, okay, so in other words, it will be a surprise, right? :)

    Yes the pot is approximately 4 inches. The flowers are slightly more than 2 inches wide.

    I think it will probably stay this size through the winter, and grow again once I repot it. What do you think?

    My orchid came with styrofoam inside the pot, at the bottom. Is it alright to leave it like that?
     

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