Is this Manoic?

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Kada, Mar 29, 2011.

  1. Kada

    Kada Active Member 10 Years

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    I am fairly sure this is Manoic (Manihot esculenta), but before taking cuttings to grow it and eat it, i want to be 110% sure. They have great huge massive roots, and the leaves are usually more red and purple than right now.

    i have not yet ever noticed flowers on them, but they certainly could have i never paid much attention to these. they are a weed here.

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    Thanks for any help.
     
  2. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    It appears to be Cassava (Manihot esculenta), however there are several
    clones with various amounts of toxic glocosides. You must determine
    the edibility first. Preparation varies with each type.
    http://www.floridata.com/ref/m/mani_esc.cfm
     
  3. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    It's Manioc alright. Do you have any way of determining whether the plants have bloomed? In all of the types, the roots are considered inedible after blooming. Other than that, careful preparation is key.

    Bon apetit!
     
  4. Kada

    Kada Active Member 10 Years

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    great thanks. I didn't know that about after flowering. So I assume cuttings of plants that have flowered would be the same, or would the new roots need to have flowers again for there to be problems?

    saltcedar, do you know of a way, aside form eating it, to find out (also without a lab or money for chem tests)?

    thanks guys :)
     
  5. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Fortunately the Cyanide tends to cook off so lacking local info' I'd grow
    a (cutting grown) new crop, as Lorax suggests and peel and cook in one change of
    water then sample a small amount. Don't use any of the old existing root.
    Flowering wasn't a problem with Florida clones but that may not apply to you.
     
  6. Kada

    Kada Active Member 10 Years

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    Great thanks so much. So the new roots, from cuttings, should theoretically be ok if the mother plant has flowered? The plants in the pics are growing in an abandoned farm by our house (so they must have been grown to eat) but the plants are obviously very old. the bulbs on some are about 9kg. and the thicker stems about 5" diameter, so seem old and must have flowered (we just moved here into this house).

    Thanks again for the help. My wife is pregnant so i think i will skip cooking a family dinner with it, but if im on my own i see no harm in looking into it.
     
  7. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Flowering is only of concern if your crop plants are flowering.
     
  8. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Absolutely - cuttings are regarded as new plants, and you'll have a nice haul of smaller, more tender tubers in about 8 months. If you're up to 9kg of root on the mothers, those plants have bloomed at least once and they won't be edible. (And even if they were, they'd be woody as heck. The largest tubers after an 8-month harvest cycle here are usually discarded, as the texture will be terrible.)
     
  9. Kada

    Kada Active Member 10 Years

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    Ok wonderful! they are not woody, they are wood! lol, very hard! New cuttings starting tomorrow :)

    Thanks again guys :)
     
  10. CactiLoverNikki

    CactiLoverNikki Member

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    ? i am confused i have seen plants like this called umbrella plants are these a similiar/same type of species yet different name of know as an umbrella plant and who knew plants of different variations could edible:P
     
  11. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Nikki, Schefflera (umbrella plants) are fairly similar to look at, but they're from a completely different family.
     
  12. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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  13. CactiLoverNikki

    CactiLoverNikki Member

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    :P well i learnt something new:P i volunteered at a greenhouse so i was just starting 2 learn until they cut me off i believe my worker in charge of the placement may have somthing 2 do with it but 4 me i do good with growing herbs like basil thyme etc etc cacti i am doing fine with loww maintainence easy 2 take care of u just gotta know how much water them n when which i am still learning but 2nd or 3rd day havibng a young 1 n its doing great:)

    and interesting i do well with succulents n cacti tho i wish i could go back 2 my placement 2 learn more through experiance:)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 2, 2011

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