Identification: Is this a peace lily?

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by lead63, Jun 14, 2009.

  1. lead63

    lead63 Member

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    I am attempting to identify this plant that was given to me over a year ago at the passing of my mother. Don't ever recall seeing any flowers.

    We are considering putting it in a different pot - 2 inches wider. I understand that if it is a peace lily (variety???) then it should be watered once a week. The water could sit overnight to remove any chlorine. Then run-off in a tray removed after about 6 hours. Finally, fertilizer about once a month added to the water. Does this sound correct?

    In any case the first part is to identify it. It doesn't look like any of the peace lilies that I've seen photos of here on UBC. Any help here would be appreciated?
     

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  2. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    definitely an aroid. i'd hazard a guess that it's a philodendron or possibly an anthurium.

    any water that collects in the drip tray should be removed within the hour, not six...that applies for any plant, not just peace lilies.
     
  3. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Not a Spathiphyllum: a Philodendron, perhaps. Shout out to Forum aroidophiles!

    Plant looks good.
     
  4. James D.

    James D. Active Member

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    It is a philodendron, we recieved some at my work but they were never labeled ( we also didn't order them). I have one at home now and it seems to grow better in a smaller pot and with either morning or late afternoon light and quite a bit of water. I have looked everywhere and can't find the exact name of this species.
     
  5. juniejane

    juniejane Member

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    Looks like a droopy Bird of Paradise...
     
  6. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    james, junie may have a point here about it being a strelitzia. i always thought they had thinner leaves (don't ask me why as i've never even seen one)...just googled for it and the leaves do match the pics i found...could still be a philo though, too...

    i'd suggest moving the thread over to the aroid section...if it's not a philo, you'll know for sure soon enough.
     
  7. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    It appears to be a hybridized Philodendron but I can't be certain of what it might be related to without more detailed photos. It is possibly related to Philodendron erubescens. If you can post close up photos of both the upper and lower sides of the leaf as well as the petiole (what most would call the stem) as well as the stem itself we might have a better shot at an ID. The stem is the base of the plant and the petioles connect the leaf lamina to that stem. I think I can see a new leaf developing and if there is a cataphyll surrounding that leaf a good shot will help. A cataphyll is a "sheath-like" cover that surrounds newly developing foliage. In the case of Philodendron erubescens the cataphyll will reflex and turn backwards as it begins to slightly roll backwards. Also, if there is red or burgundy on the underside of the plant that is a good clue.

    Compare your plant to the photos on this page: http://www.exoticrainforest.com/Philodendron erubescens pc.html
     
  8. lead63

    lead63 Member

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    Here are three more photos as suggested. I don't know how to move this thread, but if those who know think it should be in another area, please advise on how to do it or the moderator can move it. I guess the new title would be "Is this a Philo?"
     

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  9. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    The new cataphyll in the center photo doesn't appear to be from Philodendron erubescens even though the leaf blades are somewhat correct. The blades are a bit large and possess too many lateral leaf veins for a P. erubescens but this could easily be a hybridized form with an unknown parent. The stem (base of the plant) in photo #3 appears to be juvenile so even though I wish I could offer you more information it would simply be a guess. A few other things make this one less than easy to figure out including the shape of the petioles. The petiole is the connection between the leaf and the stem at the base. The petiole of Philodendron erubescens is often flat on the upper surface but I can see both a flattened petiole (called D shaped) and a sulcate petiole which would have a canal running down the axis (known as C shaped). Philodendron species are highly variable which makes offering a possible ID on a juvenile plant more than a bit risky.

    I can tell for sure this is not an Anthurium since there is no collective vein running around the leaf or a Spathiphyllum (Peace Lily) since the stem is wrong and is in fact a Philodendron (likely a hybrid). I just don't know what the species parentage might be.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2009
  10. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    if steve says it's a philodendron, then you can take that to the bank! thanks for the id, steve!!
     
  11. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    I've been researching hybrids created from Philodendron erubescens crossed with an unknown Philodendron parent species. I've found a few that appear close to your plant so my guess would be that one parent is likely P. erubescens. You should be aware that color has nothing to do with a species due to natural variation so the vivid red on the stem of the hybrid is of no consequence. The original parent could have easily been a sport or other hybrid of P. erubescens. A sport is a natural variation that is somewhat unusual in coloration and/or shape. Philodendron erubescens is commonly used to create hybrid Philodendron variations and I suspect your plant is some sort of hybrid.

    This sport/hybrid was sold in the 1950's as Philodendron 'Ace of Spades'. Many others have come and gone over the years and can easily be purchased today in a variety of garden centers.

    By the way, these plants display best if allowed to climb a totem.
     

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