Is this a conifer?

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by maricela, Jan 2, 2010.

  1. maricela

    maricela Member

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    Hello, I was stumped when I saw this tree/shrub. Is it a conifer? Please help with the ID. Thanks,

    Maricela
     

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  2. David in L A

    David in L A Active Member 10 Years

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    Looks like a Hakea.
     
  3. Lila Pereszke

    Lila Pereszke Well-Known Member 10 Years

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  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Which, for clarification, is not a conifer. Family Proteaceae.
     
  5. SusanDunlap

    SusanDunlap Active Member

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    Conifers do not produce flowers, instead, they produce "cones". The vast majority of conifers are also "evergreen".

    The term evergreen also applies to other types of shrubs and trees that DO produce flowers. Flowering evergreen shrubs are distinct from flowering non-evergreen shrubs. "Deciduous" is a widely used synonym for non-evergreen.

    See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinophyta
    Quoted from above:
    (Conifers) are cone-bearing seed plants with vascular tissue; all extant conifers are woody plants, the great majority being trees with just a few being shrubs. Typical examples of conifers include cedars, douglas-firs, cypresses, firs, junipers, kauris, larches, pines, redwoods, spruces, and yews.[1]
     

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