Is it still too early to plant Echinacea?

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Kathleen, Mar 6, 2007.

  1. Kathleen

    Kathleen Member

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    I live in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. I would like to plant some Echinacea in my garden for summer blooming. The Garden shop close to my home seems to have them in stock now. Can I buy them now and put them into my garden, or is it still way too early??
    Thank you for your help
    Kathleen
     
  2. bcgift52

    bcgift52 Active Member

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    Yes it's okay to buy and plant echinacea now - it's perfectly hardy and even a late freeze won't do any damage.
     
  3. Gordo

    Gordo Active Member 10 Years

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    While you certainly could purchase and plant these now, it might be better to wait, if this is left over stock from last year. Best selection of late season bloomers is usually quite a bit later than this, and may give you the opportunity to select from any of the multitude of new varieties of Echinacea on the market. Personally, I prefer some of the newer dwarf varieties, as they are less apt to flop over. Selections include 'Kim's Kneehigh' and 'Little Giant'.
     
  4. Kathleen

    Kathleen Member

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    Dear bcgift52 Thank you for your reply. I will go out and see what they have available. Kathleen
     
  5. Kathleen

    Kathleen Member

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    Dear Gordo. Thanks for your very good advice. I will go and look and perhaps wait for a better selection . Kathleen
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Just look them over and see if they look OK. If nobody is looking dump out of pots and examine roots (not likely to have soil come off if left from last year), if plenty present and they look bright, fresh and healthy no need to pass them over.
     
  7. oscar

    oscar Active Member

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    Never turn plants upside down to check the roots, unless you know what you're doing, plants that are lightly rooted (as they should be sold) can still all fall apart.

    I do agree, sometimes a plant from last year can be a better bet than a new plant.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2007
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Old stock of a vigorous plant like coneflower still in small pots from last year not likely to fall apart. In fact, 'fresh' stock often arrives from growers already in a potbound condition. And garden center buyers tend to balk at plants that are in the desired size in relation to their containers, these being seen as "too small." This will be based on the 'requirements' of customers who see a huge top coming out of an undersized pot as a nice, big plant, a good value.

    Obviously you should look at the plants beforehand with a view toward judging if they will come apart when turned out. Slipping a fully rooted plant out of and back into a pot is usually inconsequential, I wouldn't suggest it otherwise.
     

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