Identification: Is it a ganoderma applanatum

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by BC reishi, Dec 18, 2013.

  1. BC reishi

    BC reishi New Member

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    Hi,
    I collected several pieces of big mushrooms in BC , I am not sure they are ganoderma applanatums(artist's conk), red reishi? Are there anyone can help me to identify? Also I would like to do a lab testing to get nutrition fact, anyone knows which lab can do it?

    Thanks
     

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  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    *bump* at user's request
     
  3. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Greetings!

    Sorry I missed your post - December was a busy month for me.

    Photo #2 - These look like Fomitopsis pinicola, noting the "red belt" that this species often has on the margin.
    Photo #1 - These might be Ganoderma applanatum, hard to tell without more information.

    I strongly recommend only collecting one specimen (or very few depending on mushroom type) when you are not sure of your identification. If you collect many, then throw them away if they are not the type you are looking for, then it is a waste. Fungi use mushrooms for reproduction, and if we are too careless with our harvesting of them, then we risk reducing their numbers or in some cases losing species entirely from particular habitats. Not in our interest or theirs.

    Also, on a related note since we're on the topic <grin>, polypores like red belts and artist's conks are important substrates/habitats for many invertebrates: There are some recent studies encouraging us to note the impact on the life web when we remove large quantities of ie woody debris or polypores from a forest. When wooded areas are "cleaned up" of logs and branches, or when eg. trail building is done improperly or in too much quantity in an area, the ecology can also be damaged in ways we clearly have little understanding of yet.

    <steps down off of soapbox...>

    Regarding testing, there is some work being done at UBC on this, but as it is a study in progress, I'm doubting they would be able/willing to do individual testing for a private individual. Never hurts to ask though :-). You could also try contacting a local reishi grower/distributor as they may have other resources to suggest to you.

    cheers!
    - frog
     
  4. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    ... Also, please note that the mushroom that is usually called Reishi or Ling zhi does not grow in B.C.

    Hope that helps,
    frog
     
  5. ScottWales

    ScottWales Member

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    Did you happen to notice what colour the spores were? If you store some of the brackets pore-down on some clean paper and leave it in a draught-free space, it should leave a nice spore print to aid identification.

    Do you get G. resinaceum in BC?
     
  6. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi Scott,

    As far as I know we don't have that species in coastal B.C.: We have G. applanatum and G. oregonense. But who knows, new fungi turn up all the time :-).

    cheers,
    - frog
     

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