Inaba Shidare - too much in sun?

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Lynette, May 25, 2008.

  1. Lynette

    Lynette Active Member

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    We just planted an Inaba Shidare. It required tearing out our daughter's childhood sandbox to get the best site for shelter from winds. Now it looks like the flowering almond I thought would shade it really doesn't. Shade was only creeping over around 3:30 PM. Is this going to be damaging? I am picturing a ten foot trellis to solve the problem! I'd prefer not to re-transplant it!

    Picture was taken at 10 AM.

    Lynette
    Ottawa ON
     

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    Last edited: May 25, 2008
  2. Gomero

    Gomero Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    I do not think so.

    Gomero
     
  3. kaspian

    kaspian Active Member 10 Years

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    Keep up with the watering.
     
  4. katsura

    katsura Active Member 10 Years

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    you were smart to avoid wind. i agree with Gomero & kaspian's advice.
    the tree will tell you itself BUT give it time to talk. the 1st year it may
    well get sun burned a bit but it needs to settle in on its own for at least
    a year. I have red dissectums in almost all day northern california sun and
    they do fine. give em water, attention, patience, don't feed much, mulch around
    the roots if possible and curb any melodrama. good luck & have fun with your lovely
    tree
     
  5. Lynette

    Lynette Active Member

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    Thank you all.

    It will certainly get attention especially in the Fall when I have to wrap it for our Zone 4a winters. The plan was for a riverstone bed on either side of the step/walkway. Should I mulch it around the roots or let the stones come up near the trunk?

    Many thanks, again,
    Lynette
     
  6. katsura

    katsura Active Member 10 Years

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    Lynette, I know nothing about riverstone bed as insulation to keep the roots cool &
    moist in summer and warmer in winter. perhaps that will work. i use redwood bark (bits
    or shredded) as mulch around the roots to cool them. i try to keep the mulch not
    touching the trunk (i try anyway). have fun.
     
  7. dawgie

    dawgie Active Member 10 Years

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    If you live in Ontario, I wouldn't worry. I have seen red dissectums planted in full sun in the Southeast US that handled it just fine.
     
  8. cafernan

    cafernan Active Member

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    I would pay attention with the riverstone bed near the plant, specially in summer. Stones can heat by the sun and by convection, heat could damage the tree.
    Regards
     
  9. Lynette

    Lynette Active Member

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    Hello Everyone,

    We finished the garden for the Inaba Shidare. It's quite lovely and been a joy to sit near.

    Ottawa has had a lot of rainfall in June with some very hot days. I'm noticing the leaves on the maple are drying out. So far it's lost a few small sets of three leaves each. The main branches are supple and of good colour. (the lower leaves are turning green?)

    The soil is moist under the mulch and landscape material. The surrounding soil is clayish but when we planted the tree we made sure the soil had good drainage at the roots.

    Should I be concerned?

    Lynette
     

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  10. paxi

    paxi Active Member

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    the garden looks great. The tree looks to be fine to me. I'm newish here but there have been a couple of discussions along these lines. The gist of it seems to be that it is not abnormal for even the hardiest of cultivars to show a few dry leaves during heavy heat. The greater danger at this point also seems to be overwatering during times of stress. The only concern I had reading your post was of the "landscape material" I'm not sure what you meant by this but just hope you are not using anything that will oversuffocate the plant: ie, if the surrounding soil is clay and the top is relatively impermeable you could be making a little clay pot for your tree to drown in. I may be reading too much into your post though, because it sounds like you very much had drainage in mind during the planning stage. wish you well for the fall and winter
     
  11. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Well considered answer Paxi
    Lynette ... it would be important that you have provided a means of drainage from the bottom of the planting hole to somewhere lower in the garden so that this does not happen. I usually do this with a piece of downspout filled with large gravel. It makes a mountain of difference to the long term health of the plant
     
  12. Lynette

    Lynette Active Member

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    Thank you, Paxi. Your comments are reassuring. The landscape material is permeable and the space around the trunk is open. I chose black mulch for the warming effect in winter and to be nonreflecting in the summer. The advice I got here was to not use the river stones under ithe tree which would have cooked it! I think we found a good compromise though I wanted the the walkway to be a bit more of an arc ("wild geese" style).

    Whis4ey, thank you for your advice too. The ground slopes away quite a bit - although I understand this may not be enough for drainage. I had thought of a downspout with gravel (found it on the 'net) but the potentilla was in the way and any other direction didn't seem to give it a run. Is it something we can do now without adding stress to the tree?

    Lynette
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2008
  13. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Digging down beside the planting hole shouldn't overly affect the tree. Be careful not to damage roots if you can. If it was me I would try to improve the drainage some way ... can you not go around the other plant? Maybe not. At the end of the day it has to be your own decision.....
     

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