Identification, please.

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Gwen Miller, Nov 14, 2019.

  1. Gwen Miller

    Gwen Miller New Member

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    My friend wonders what these plants are. They come up in her garden. She's lived there more than 20 years and they came with the property (North Vancouver.) She describes them as lily-like, and the bloom colours vary.
    My only guess is a Fritillaria of some sort. Am I in the ballpark?
     

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  2. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Contributor 10 Years

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  3. Gwen Miller

    Gwen Miller New Member

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  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    If you examine it at flowering time this species has the typical orchid floral morphology, that is of course unlike that of fritillaries and lilies.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2019
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  5. Margot

    Margot Well-Known Member

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    I suspect Epipactis helleborine is becoming more widespread . . . it turned up for the first time in my garden a few years ago and is self-seeding everywhere. Friends on the Lower Mainland report finding them too and, like me, are having trouble getting rid of them. Bits of rhizome left in the ground can continue to grow; glyphosate is not terribly effective.
    Many plants we admire in small numbers become nuisances when they propagate themselves too enthusiastically.
     
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  6. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    Nice plant. As it is very often the case with introduced by humans plants where they do not belong, can become a nuisance on the American continent. Resorting to glyphosate to fight it looks to me like a great exaggeration though.
     
  7. Margot

    Margot Well-Known Member

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    I agree. Glyphosate is too expensive to waste on small numbers of plants that can probably be eradicated by mechanical means.
     

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