identification of alpine plant

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Betsy Waddington, Sep 7, 2009.

  1. Betsy Waddington

    Betsy Waddington Member

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    I found this plant growing above about 2300m on a ridge East of the continetal divide in the Central Rockies (White Goat Wilderness area) I can't find it in my plant books.
    Any suggestions?
     

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  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Aster family, have seen it also but don't remember what it's called.
     
  3. tbcgron

    tbcgron Active Member

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    looks like a Dwarf Sawwort, saussurea densa in my book
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Knew it was "Sauss" something.
     
  5. abgardeneer

    abgardeneer Active Member

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    It's Saussurea nuda var. densa, according to the area it was seen in.
     
  6. Betsy Waddington

    Betsy Waddington Member

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    Thanks. What book are you using. I have the Lone Pine series for all of BC but its not in any of them.
     
  7. tbcgron

    tbcgron Active Member

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    I think Ron B and Abgardeneer are not using books but just have a wealth of knowledge. I use various books from the lone pine series. This one I found in "Plants of the Rocky Mountains" (Kershaw/MasKinnon/Pojar, the usual suspects.
     
  8. abgardeneer

    abgardeneer Active Member

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    Flora of Alberta by Moss and Packer. The popular plant picture books are very useful and approachable (and I have a shelf of them), but they are never comprehensive, and they lack the detail to use to distinguish similar species... not that that applies in this case.
     

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