Identification: First time ever seeing these!

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by catharsis, May 27, 2014.

  1. catharsis

    catharsis New Member

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    So I live in Kansas and we had rain on and off for the past few days and when I went out to check on my garden I noticed these orange little pearls growing around my lettuce. I have no ideal what they are and how to take care to get rid of them from my garden or if they're harmful at all. I'd appreciate any information anyone can provide me with!
     

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  2. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Might be Lycogala epidendrum, 'wolf's milk' slime mold.
    (How says't thou, Frog...?)
    Try puncturing one of these...see if 'pink toothpaste' emerges.
     
  3. catharsis

    catharsis New Member

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    Ya when it's punctured there is a pinkish goo that oozes out.
     
  4. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Good call Togata - agreed!

    I don't think I've seen it in this quantity before.

    cheers
    -frog
     
  5. catharsis

    catharsis New Member

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    Its covered a pretty decent patch of the garden so far. I have no clue if the area will spread of if it'll just contain itself in this patch. One thing I'm worried about is that it'll effect the lettuce that is growing since its growing in and around them.
     

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  6. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    It will likely provide some additional nutrition for the lettuces after some of it is incorporated into the soil, including potentially useful levels of nitrogen: There was some research years ago, which I wish I'd saved at the time, in Scandinavia on the feasibility of using myxomycetes as a protein source, on growing them commercially. I don't know which ones they were exploring for this, but if I find the original material I'll post an excerpt or link.
    cheers,
    frog
     
  7. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Definitely beneficial - it is converting the compost in the bed into nutrients that the lettuce can take up.
     
  8. Joel Bolete

    Joel Bolete Active Member

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    Fantastic! I love it
     

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