Identification: ID - Polypore

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by Joel Bolete, Oct 3, 2012.

  1. Joel Bolete

    Joel Bolete Active Member

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    This guy here I found growing Live Conifer.

    Growing around the roots.
    Salal and Holly present.
    Small amounts of moss.
    Flesh is soft to brittle.
    Smell is mushroomy.
    found at 800ft.
    Near Vancouvers North shore

    Seemed to have stem, growing from under and upon living wood.
     

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  2. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi Joel,
    Do you see pores on the underside of this "cap"?
    If it has pores and if you still have it: Is the taste bitter or mild, and does it stain reddish when bruised?
    Thanks!
    frog
     
  3. Joel Bolete

    Joel Bolete Active Member

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    YES -Pores
    Taste - Mild-medium mushroomy, kinda peppery.
    No bruising.
     
  4. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Well ... so far it's not a clear match to any of the usual local cheese-type polypores, so based in the info so far I can't ID it.

    It's probably a species of Oligoporus, Postia or Tyromyces.

    ... I was hoping it would be red staining - sometimes the mushroom just won't cooperate with the ID I want it to be, eh :-)

    cheers,
    frog
     
  5. Joel Bolete

    Joel Bolete Active Member

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    Tyromyces:

    I conclude that this is that genus.
    The pores are tight and spongy, soft and of non distinct odor.
    The flavor is mild/medium but again nothing different.

    This mush grows as a shelf and tends to curl upwards, just like my find.

    The others had longer pores, spaced farther apart and were more of a conical or upside down cup shape.

    Tyromyces, very cool to meet you!
     

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