ID Please

Discussion in 'Maples' started by xman, May 26, 2009.

  1. xman

    xman Active Member

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    Hi,

    I saw a number of these trees in Milwaukee, and they looked really pretty with the reddish brown leaves. They seem to be common here, and are used as street trees. Are these some kind of maple?

    thanks,
    xman
     

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  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Cultivars of Norway Maple Acer platanoides.

    Can be a nuisance invasive weed tree.
     
  3. JohanAbrandt

    JohanAbrandt Active Member

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    My guess would be that its a Norway maple, Acer platanoides 'Crimson King'.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    'Crimson King' is but one of multiple purple-leaved Norway Maple cultivars common in North America.
     
  5. JohanAbrandt

    JohanAbrandt Active Member

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    Indeed.
     
  6. alex66

    alex66 Rising Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
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    another is Crimson Sentry,have uprigth habitat..
     
  7. sarahatbernheim

    sarahatbernheim Active Member Maple Society

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    Acer platanoides is on the Invasive Species list. I've seen several around here in the Lansing, MI area.
     
  8. paxi

    paxi Active Member

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  9. Gomero

    Gomero Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Thanks for the link Paxi, I read it but when it says:

    I have a hard time agreeing on the shallow roots concern. I grow A. rubrum and A. platanoides in my garden and my impression is that the root sytem of the American native is more superficial and aggressive than in the case of the European native. I do agree with the higher shade tolerance of platanoides seedlings.

    Gomero
     
  10. paxi

    paxi Active Member

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    Aww come on, Do americans always have to be the more aggressive species? :) Sorry, couldn't resist the joke - haven't had my morning coffee!
     
  11. JohanAbrandt

    JohanAbrandt Active Member

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    Species?

    =)
     
  12. Gomero

    Gomero Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Paxi, I do enjoy very much humor so be my (aggressive) guest ;o))

    More seriously, I find this current 'political correctedness' trend on chasing 'invasives' and making you feel real guilty (which by the way is strongest and extremest in the anglo-saxon world: New Zealand, Australia, UK, USA and Canada) a true put down.

    Labeling A. pseudoplatanus as invasive could be one example of that since its seedlings are tender and easily destroyed; nothing compared with Rhus typhina, that's a true invasive almost impossible to get rid of (I know what I am talking about since I've been trying to eliminate it from my garden for the last 5 years, triclopyr and glyphosate do not seem to be able to complete the job). Even for this case, there are no French lists of 'invasives' not to be planted or commercialized; garden centers continue to sell Rhus and people continue to plant them, and the plant continues to escape into the wild where, due to the lack of checks and balances, it will displace the native flora,...etc, etc....blah-blah-blah. However its Fall colors beat any native and only for that I am happy they spread widely in the French countryside replacing dull native species.

    Reading further in Paxi's link I came across something incredible regarding another 'invasive':

    How in the world could anybody declare such a useful and beneficial plant 'undesirable', 'to be eliminated'; it really smacks of unapologetic chauvinism.

    Gomero
     
  13. xman

    xman Active Member

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    Location:
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    Thank you for your replies. They have not considered it as invasive in Milwaukee yet, as I see them lining their streets with these. Just today I saw a street that had about 20 of these at 5 - 6 feet size.

    thanks,
    xman
     

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