id please

Discussion in 'Araceae' started by funnyfarmherbs, Oct 29, 2007.

  1. funnyfarmherbs

    funnyfarmherbs Member

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    anyone know this ones name? he appears to want to climb. thanks bruce
     

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  2. funnyfarmherbs

    funnyfarmherbs Member

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    this plant has been in a 1 gallon pot and the roots were exposed and starting to climb to edge of pot so i recently repotted it to a larger container with something to climb.
     
  3. LariAnn

    LariAnn Active Member

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    I have an idea but could you tell more about where the plant came from? Have you ever seen the adult specimen? This plant appears to be a juvenile and at that size, getting a good ID is next to impossible. If what I am thinking about it is correct, the mature plant will look markedly different from this small specimen.
     
  4. funnyfarmherbs

    funnyfarmherbs Member

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    I guess I am going to have to wait on this one. I got the plant several months ago from a local flea market. I have not seen an adult and the seller did not know it's name. When I got it the leaves were mostly smooth and oval and just now the serration is starting to develop. Thank you
     
  5. LariAnn

    LariAnn Active Member

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    Have a look at what I think it might be when it matures. This is not a P. selloum; I don't have a definitive ID on it myself but I have hybridized with it and the young plants look very much like yours.

    http://aroidiaresearch.org/pgiantp.htm

    LariAnn
    Aroidia Research
     
  6. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Would like some input, but does anyone else think this could possibly be a juvenile Philodendron warszewiczii? If you look up the adult form you will see a very different plant with very fine leaf lobes. I've got a few leaves just developing that do resemble this form. As LariAnn correctly pointed out, juvenile Philodendron species are very difficult to recognize. They morp a great deal as they grow. Bill? Brian? Others? Any opinions?
     
  7. raymikematt

    raymikematt Active Member

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    Steve, Juvenile plants of P. warszewiczii that i have seen seem to have a similar appearance but much wider, sometimes wider than long, leaf. Could be variable though so you may be right.
     
  8. LariAnn

    LariAnn Active Member

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    A few observations, if I may: The plant pictured appears to have coloration in the petioles; P. warszewiczii has no color other than green in the petioles. Also, I've seen juvenile P. warszewiczii and they do not resemble the plant pictured, as raymikematt has observed. The plant I provided a link for is MUCH larger than the largest P. warszewiczii I have ever seen, and the leaves emerge a pinkish color, something you'll never see in P. warszewiczii.
     
  9. Sigtris

    Sigtris Active Member

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    I think this is a juvenile P. selloum, I have many a few and the young plants look very much like the one in the picture.
     
  10. bluesea

    bluesea Member

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    I think this may be P. mayoi. What do you think Michael M?
    Russ
     
  11. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    What an observation! I'll go check my specimen as well for any new leaves! And to those who have been after him, Bluesea is Russ!!!!!
     
  12. bluesea

    bluesea Member

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    I notice that the petiole is reddish. If it has very pale reddish veins on the reverse
    of the leaf, I'd say much more confidently that it's mayoi.

    If it doesn't have the reddish veins, then I'd look toward other vining types that have
    'fingered' edged leaves at maturity. But none I know of have the reddish petioles that
    this plant displays, so I'll be very surprised if it's not mayoi.

    Russ
     
  13. funnyfarmherbs

    funnyfarmherbs Member

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    Will this pic help. If Russ is right do I need to send him a toaster oven? Thanks Bruce
     

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  14. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Go ahead! I'll send him one too!

    Thanks Russ, I just learned something new about Philodendron mayoi. I had never noticed that until you pointed it out. I just went out and checked and you are absolutely correct! I'm going to need to take a new photo of my plant and post it to clearly show that red petiole and the veins! Man, I love this UBC aroid forum!

    Here's a link to the information I got on the plant from Dr. Eduardo Gonçalves in Brazil. Dr.Gonçalves is the botanical author of the species.
    http://www.exoticrainforest.com/Philodendron mayoi pc.html

    And by the way, Russ, there are a bunch more threads that need your expertise!
     
  15. bluesea

    bluesea Member

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    Bruce, now that I see the underside of the leaf, I'm sure it's P. mayoi. Steve has an
    excellent informational page on his website about this very nice vining Philodendron.
    Kudos on finding this at a flea market Bruce, great score.

    Russ
     
  16. raymikematt

    raymikematt Active Member

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    Agreed Russ. Looks like P. mayoi to me. Is it still going by this name or is there a new one? For some reason I thought it was changed??

    Michael M.
     
  17. bluesea

    bluesea Member

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    Thanks for the reply Michael. You know, I felt uneasy posting the ID as mayoi because
    there was something about this name that I couldn't recall. Just to make sure, I did check Steve's site before I posted, he's still calling it mayoi. But I think you're right, there's been something published about the name in the last year or so. I'll do some research and get back with anything I find.

    Russ
     
  18. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    I received an email directly from Dr. Gonçalves in Brazil that stated the name is correct. I got that about 10 months ago. Since he published the species, I know of nothing otherwise but I will send him another note.
     
  19. bluesea

    bluesea Member

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    Did some poking around, I find nothing different about the name mayoi, so I think I'd
    make your label Bruce. Steve's info on his site is as current as I could find, and he's
    got it from the proverbial 'horse's mouth' in Dr. Goncalves. Can't get much better than
    that! The name is often erroneously spelled 'mayoii', which Steve points out.

    Michael M, we may be keying on the change from whatever mayoi was called before,
    to the official mayoi name. I can't remember the prior unofficial name. Anyone recall,
    just out of curiosity??

    Russ
     
  20. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Just checked TROPICOS. Philodendron mayoi is the only current valid name.
     
  21. funnyfarmherbs

    funnyfarmherbs Member

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    Thanks for the help guys, great observation thank you bruce
     
  22. raymikematt

    raymikematt Active Member

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    Thanks guys....it probably was another plant I was thinking of.
     
  23. AndrewAE

    AndrewAE New Member

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    I’ve heard that the name for Philodendron Mayoii and Philodendron Tahiti are interchangeable. Anyone know if this is true? I don’t want to buy the wrong plant
     
  24. Tom Hulse

    Tom Hulse Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi Andrew, welcome to the forum. I have seen where some Youtubers are proposing the cultivar Philodendron 'Tahiti' is the same as the species Philodendron mayoi, and that may be true, but I've also seen it equated to other species such as P. lacerum. I believe this cultivar was originally introduced by Twyford Plant Laboratories around roughly 2001 as 'Tahiti Green'. I don't think there has been any published info on the parentage at all, but it seems possibly more likely to be one of the multi-hybrids that were floating around in Florida at the time, instead of a single species. The problem is that without a good original description or photos ever available from the introducer, it is impossible to know if you certainly have the same as the original plant, or perhaps a Philodendron mayoi or radiatum, or lacerum , or Thaumatophyllum xanadu, etc., etc. (or even one of the masses of NOID multi-hybrid cultivars). Many people carelessly change or add tags to these based on erroneous ID's because they don't realize how many similar species and cultivars there are, and they also don't realize how many, many Philodendron tend to look alike when juvenile. So over time, the poorly described cultivars get diluted with incorrect ID's and it becomes impossible to ID a new plant confidently.

    So if you're buying a new plant, I would stick to a reputable seller that is offering a specific species-named plant, like Philodendron mayoi, and not a poorly described and nebulous cultivar name.
     
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