ID please

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by David R, Jun 7, 2007.

  1. David R

    David R Member

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    I took these photos on a recent trip to the Southern Thai rainforests.
    I've had these floating around in my picture folder for a while, so it'd be great to put a name to them.

    The succulent was found in a small market.
    The Fabaceae was found on the verge of dense rainforest, so probably deposited by a vehicle and not endemic.
    The large 5 petaled one is only part of the flower from a large rainforest tree.
    The red flowers were found on a small shrub in a large town and not found naturally in the area.

    Any help would be great.
     

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  2. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    The last one is Ixora

    HTH
    Chris
     
  3. cactologist

    cactologist Member

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    The succulent looks like a crested form of Euphorbia milii. Maybe the legume is Clitoria macrophylla.

    Tracy
     
  4. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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  5. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    The second one shouts out Apocynaceae to me - but I'm not 100% certain.
     
  6. David R

    David R Member

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    Oh good. Thanks so far.
    Euphorbia lactea Cristata is unmistakably correct.
    Ixora...it was on the tip of my tongue for months.
    Clitoria macrophylla is right too.
    And, frangipani was everywhere so Apocynaceae is possibly right.

    Thanks everyone for your help
     
  7. TonyR

    TonyR Active Member

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    2nd one (fallen pink flower and leaves) is one of the dipterocarps, probably a Dipterocarpus sp. such as D. alatus. These are now included in family Malvaceae. You really need to see the fruit, or at least the calyx, to know for certain whether it is Dipterocarpus or Shorea.

    3rd (green bracts) looks like Moghania strobilifera.

    4th (mauve legume) is Centrosema sp., possibly C. pubescens, widely naturalised in the Old World

    See this link for pictures of the 2 legumes.
    http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/imaxxfab.htm
     
  8. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    *snap* I frequently get tripped up on some of the malvoid plants, thinking them to be Apocynaceae.
     
  9. TonyR

    TonyR Active Member

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    Daniel, see if your library has the book Forest trees of Northern Thailand by Gardner, Sidisunthorn and Anusarnsunthorn. Early in im ramblings around Thailand I decided I needed to come to grips with the dipterocarps, which are the dominant trees over large areas, and found this wonderful book had most of the answers. It is comprehensive, profusely illustrated with (often) multiple photos per species and is just about as useful in central Thailand as in the south.
     
  10. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Added it to our "books wanted" list!
     

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