I miss summer

Discussion in 'Maples' started by krautz33, Dec 4, 2005.

  1. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Location:
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    By reattach, I meant reupload - sorry! Things are fine as they are!
     
  2. carbluesnake

    carbluesnake Active Member

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    Location:
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    I really like this thread, as it was about summer and the emotions that well up within us. One could say it is not relevant to maples, but I would disagree. All of us share those emotions; that's why we're maple guys. And women. If these emotions were not resident within us, we would probably not be interested in maples. Our maples give us fulfullment and contentment.
    Tell you the truth, I like the ideas about roses and how they relate to maples. My interest in maples is relatively new; perhaps 6 years. I look at the pictures and am in awe of the talent possessed by the people in this thread. I am using some conifers with my maples, but only where they can get enough light. Cryptomeria, chamaecyparis, dawn redwood, cypress, 1 leyland cypress. I can't utilize any blue spruce, firs or the like as they can't stand these Texas summers.
     
  3. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
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    It is bound to happen that other plants will be
    written about in regards to Maples. I know
    what Daniel really meant and I agree there
    that the photos of the group of Roses more
    correctly should have been posted in the Rose
    forum and then a link provided into this thread.
    A moderator can do that for us if need be.

    Then again we have a Maple in the species photo
    gallery that is still there after I've mentioned it to
    people in a polite manner to move it where it
    belongs in the palmatum photo gallery. So, with
    that in mind crossover plants in the Maple forum
    has to be thought of as being okay but there is
    another method that is probably better for us to
    utilize. I'll admit it took me a while to better
    realize the benefit of it.

    I see no real reason why a Blue Spruce cannot
    be grown in Texas considering they are just
    as heat tolerant as some of the other Conifers
    mentioned. I'd give it a whirl in a heartbeat,
    although you may want to grow seedlings
    instead rather than named varieties of Blue
    Spruce, although Koster and Hoopsii can
    be heat tolerant for us here and we get just
    as hot and for just as long as you do. If you
    can put up with needle rust fungus and mites
    on Cryptomeria, then growing Blue Spruce
    is not a problem. You just need to know
    what not to do for growing Blue Spruce in
    a sustained warm environ.

    Jim
     
  4. thebronze

    thebronze Member

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    I'm not positive, but I think there is a really nice blue spruce in the Ft. Worth Japanese gardens that is probably 30' tall and has been there for quite a long time. It could be a cedar but I have never seen one with that coloring or with the short needle bunches. Its not quite blue, but more of a silver blue, kind of like the dallas cowboys color. I think I even have some pics at home so you guys can try to ID it.
    So if it grows in Ft. Worth I would think Nacodoches would be ok....?
     
  5. oscar

    oscar Active Member

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  6. Layne Uyeno

    Layne Uyeno Active Member 10 Years

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    I've never been to that Japanese garden, but perhaps you saw a Chamaecyparis pisifera, perhaps 'Boulevard'? Very beautiful silver blue foliage. It almost glows in the shade.

    http://www.hort.uconn.edu/plants/c/chapis/chapis1.html

    This link has a close up of the leaves.

    http://www.mobot.org/gardeninghelp/plantfinder/Plant.asp?code=A356

    I think this would make a great companion plant for Japanese maples. Perhaps a red leaved maple to contrast the silver blue foliage.

    Layne
     
  7. thebronze

    thebronze Member

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    Layne, that tree didnt resemble any of those.
    It looks exactly like a deodar cedar, but bluish grey instead.
    It was also very thin and airy, most likely from the gardener though...
     
  8. carbluesnake

    carbluesnake Active Member

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    I have a deodar cedar, and it is silvery blue gray. It is a wonderful contrast with an atropurpureum close to it. I also received a boulevard chamaecyparis this winter. It is only 15-18 inches. It is planted with a yellow mop chamaecyparis, an a.p. red dissectum, and a tsuma gaki. It should really look good this spring. Can't wait.
     
  9. Metro Maples

    Metro Maples Member Maple Society

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    Location:
    Fort Worth Texas
    The tall blue conifer in the Fort Worth Japanese Garden is a Blue Atlas Cedar. Do you know they have more than 100 Japanese maples and have been growing them there for over 50 years. They are quite large. It was quite spectaucular last fall. Does anybody know what the species or cultivar they have?
     
  10. thebronze

    thebronze Member

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    Location:
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    Blue Atlas Cedar, ok, its definitely a good looking tree and seems to be very healthy.

    Most of the acers I see at the FWJG are plain old palmatums red and green but thats from an untrained eye. They have a few specimens of tall greens with much smaller palmate leaves that always seem 2 shades paler green than the rest. I've been wondering what those might be.
    I think I spend more time looking at all the different pines they have and the shapes they are in. I also noticed the impressive roots of the bald cypress by the koi ponds that seem to stretch 50' in each direction.
    I think my favorite part of the whole park is the huge cottonwood tree that is probably 100' tall. Every book I have on Texas tree's warns how bad they are but they are amazing up close. Not too many this size left in DFW.
     

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