I guess I should be worried?

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Luke’s Maples, Mar 15, 2020.

  1. zfrittz

    zfrittz Active Member

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    Another thing that makes the roots grow a lot is the extract or slurry of nettle is an excellent biostimulant that enhances development and strengthens the natural defenses of plants.
    For its preparation it is necessary to collect the nettle, having to macerate 1 kg of fresh nettle in 10 liters of water. They must remain in maceration for 10 days, stirring every 2-3 days. Once it is verified that there are no more bubbles and that a film has been created above the water, the mash is ready to be filtered and stored in tightly closed containers in a dark place.
    To use it has to be diluted 20 times in water and can be applied throughout the year, repeating the application every 10-15 days.
     
  2. Acerholic

    Acerholic Contributor Maple Society

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    Hi zfrittz, already do this, have been making my own feed this way for about 40 years. If anybody else doesn't do this then they should , its brilliant and free. (It stinks though)
     
  3. zfrittz

    zfrittz Active Member

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    Ha ha, it does smell bad, but it helps plants a lot.
     
  4. AlainK

    AlainK Rising Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    Many links on the net. I watched a video stating that once the top layer is removed, this soil recomposes itself below. In which case, this would be the ultimate example of "permaculture".

    I think that the entry on Wikipedia is a good starter:

    Terra preta - Wikipedia
     
  5. Luke’s Maples

    Luke’s Maples Active Member

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    Hi everyone.

    I thought nettle tea was high in nitrogen? I remember being told it was good for tomatoes etc. I have loads of nettles haha.
     
  6. Acerholic

    Acerholic Contributor Maple Society

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    Hi Luke, I use it on my mature maples not the young ones. It is good for branch and leaf growth. I would not use it on anything under 5 years old. Also I do not use it before May 1st. As zfrittz said earlier the most important thing in the early years is root growth. Not as enjoyable to look at but really worth the effort for long term benefit.

    Hope your babies did ok during the frost the other morning.
     
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  7. Luke’s Maples

    Luke’s Maples Active Member

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    Hi. Thanks I'll keep that in mind and I may make some up next month. My babies seem to be happy. I will have a closer look at them all next week when I'm off work.
     
  8. zfrittz

    zfrittz Active Member

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    Hello, I have to say that I do not agree with the use of nettle tea only in adult plants, in my experience where the most benefit I have found has been in young plants, the elements that contain the most nettles are iron, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, silicon, trace elements and vitamins A and C, and it is these that most help the roots.
    To take advantage of them, in younger plants, we must use them before 12 to 15 days after they fully ferment.
    I mean, when we mix the nettles with the water, from the first day, and until the 12 or 15, we can collect water from the mixture and store it, (then we replace the water in the mixture), in this state it still has few bacteria and it does not smell bad, but nevertheless it is when it contains the most in the mentioned substances it has, (iron, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, silicon, trace elements, vitamins A and C and formic acid)
    This still unfermented nettle tea is the one that mixes 1 liter of tea with 10 of water, once every 10 days to promote root development.
    From day 10 to 15 it is almost fermented and the bacteria content reaches the limit, and that is when it is used for irrigation, as a compost activator, foliar fertilizer, as an insecticide, due to the high content of formic acid.
    from day 15 onwards it is used to inoculate nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the soil.
    The nettle tea that we obtain from day 10 or 12 onwards is the one that we use for the most established plants and the one that is produced in the first days is that it is used to combat pests, fungi and help root development .
    I encourage you to do the test with two clones of plants that are very fast growing, one with nettles and the other without them and in 2 months make a comparison of the root mass.
     
  9. Acerholic

    Acerholic Contributor Maple Society

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    Hi zfrittz, I can only go by 'my' experience in that nettle tea puts on a lot of upper growth. If your plants are young or newly planted then root growth is the most important. But everyone has their own experiences that they stick to.
     
  10. zfrittz

    zfrittz Active Member

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    I agree that it produces good growth, but as a consequence of root growth.
    A small cut from mid-January.
     

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  11. Acerholic

    Acerholic Contributor Maple Society

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    That has made good root growth, very interesting, think I might do a comparison trial in clear pots.
    These days the feed that I use for my mature maples is a slow release applied at the beginning of May only.
    There is a tendency to over feed maples and they really don't need much 'if any'.
    Its good to here on this forum different methods from around the world. There is always something to learn no matter how long we have been gardening.
     
  12. zfrittz

    zfrittz Active Member

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    I do the cuttings in hydroponics like the one in the photo of my profile and they create good roots.
     
  13. Acerholic

    Acerholic Contributor Maple Society

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    They obviously transplant well otherwise you wouldn't do it. Have heard that maples suffer from shock when transplanted into compost or into the ground. Never tried this myself.

    Might be worth a thread all of it's own on Hydroponics and JM's, showing the successes you have had!!?
     
  14. zfrittz

    zfrittz Active Member

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    They always suffer a little, because the roots are very fragile and break easily, but doing the transplant very carefully and after having them a week in the greenhouse recover quite well.
    I had already thought about the thread, but I do not have enough photos, I am waiting to have tender burguer maple cuttings, I think that in two months I have material and can start cloning, I have very little plant maple palmatum and the only ones that I have cloned the maple that I could for the BAP test and the ones I have left are to graft as soon as I have buds, one thread is pending on hydroponics and another thread on the type of graft that I do, which does not show anything and it is ideal for bonsai as it does not leave scars and it is much easier and safer than that of a stake.
     

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