Hydrangea Petiolaris

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by sue1, Aug 12, 2005.

  1. sue1

    sue1 Active Member 10 Years

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    It's dead, I think. I planted it in May in dappled sun spot. I dug into the soil around it and found it was very dry. I have been watering, or maybe not enough compost/mulch, and too much native soil? I dug it out and put in a big pot with good soil, keeping it moist. After 2 weeks it still looks dead. Any advice/fertilizer maybe? This plant cost me $20, so I'll try anything to save it.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    No leaves, no plant. Potting soil sheds water to surrounding soil, as do amended planting holes. Plant in uniform soil texture (same soil) throughout planting area. Search "Chalker-Scott" on www for more cultural information.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2006
  3. GRSJr

    GRSJr Active Member 10 Years

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    I tried searching the www for "Chalker-Scott" and all I got was a reference right back here. Would you give us the correct URL for the Hydrangea Petiolaris information.
     
  4. growest

    growest Active Member 10 Years

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  5. douglas

    douglas Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi

    If you bought it from a reputable grower/nursery/retail outfit they should garrentee it for 1 year if you did things right . Either take it to them to see/ or have them come out and tell you what is wrong/ (if need be raise some stink to have a cert/reg person look at it not just the yard guy)

    Regards doug
     
  6. sue1

    sue1 Active Member 10 Years

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    Oh thanks, I wouldn't have thought of that. I'll take it back to the nursery, and see what transpires.
     
  7. GRSJr

    GRSJr Active Member 10 Years

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    Good luck. I haven't been able to get one to grow here at all. Finally gave up.
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Garden center return policies vary. I never have any trouble getting Chalker-Scott's site using "Chalker-Scott", have no explanation for someone else not being able to.
     
  9. sue1

    sue1 Active Member 10 Years

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    I won't quit! I put it in a large pot, and although it looks "iffy", it actually has some tiny new growth on it. I don't think I'll take it back to the nursery, I'm going to try and "save it", so I'll protect over winter and see what happens.
     
  10. GRSJr

    GRSJr Active Member 10 Years

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    Sorry. My mistake. The dead one is Schizophragma hydrangeoides 'Moonlight' . Hydrangea anomala ssp. petiolaris is still barely alive. The tree it was growing on had to be removed, so it's growing around on the ground.

    The growth is so poor that I haven't bothered to give it a new arbor to grow on. The leaves are quite small but green. It grows only a few feet long and then just sits there.

    Not what I was led to believe - a spectacular plant?

    It has drip irrigation watering, has fertilizer every Spring, but no results.
     
  11. sue1

    sue1 Active Member 10 Years

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    I put mine in a big pot a few weeks ago now, and it's still alive, although, like yours, not doing anything, just sitting there looking dreadful...we shall see what happens over the winter.
     
  12. sue1

    sue1 Active Member 10 Years

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    Last Fall, I dug up my failing Hydrangea Petiolaris and repotted in a large plastic container. I then bubble-wrapped it, put wood mulch on top, and left it in the yard to overwinter. It is now leafing wonderfully, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed.

    If anyone has any ideas of how I might further nourish this plant, I would be grateful for the advice. Should I leave it in the container for now? Or should I try, once again, planting into the ground?
     
  13. silver_creek

    silver_creek Active Member

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    I have several climbing hydrangeas, and my experience is that they are very slow to establish. Plant in the ground, in rich soil and partial to full shade, and thoroughly water- ample moisture the first summer is crucial. It will not grow much the first 2-3 years, but if not drought stressed, it should take off after that. The saying of vines "first they sleep, then they creep, then they leap" applies very much to this plant.
     
  14. sue1

    sue1 Active Member 10 Years

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    Thanks for the advice, I shall replant in the ground and hopefully it will be ok. Do you by any chance have any recommendations for fertilizing this vine?
     
  15. silver_creek

    silver_creek Active Member

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    We have heavy soils, so I don't fertilize much; all the ornamental beds get one light spring broadcast of a rhododendron food that is cottonseed meal based. This includes the hydrangeas. The most important thing with this plant is adequate water until it is well established (ours are old enough now- and bigger than we ever anticipated- that they get no supplemental water in the summer).
     
  16. sue1

    sue1 Active Member 10 Years

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    Thanks! My other hydrangeas are doing very well (2 yrs old), but I'll fert. them lightly because they are still babies. Thanks again.

    Sue
     
  17. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Fall is the best time to fertilize hardy plants. Environmental conditions and condition of plants much more favorable for fertilizing than spring. See Whitcomb, ESTABLISHMENT AND MAINTENANCE OF LANDSCAPE PLANTS (Lacebark Inc.) for details if interested (college libraries have it).
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2006
  18. sue1

    sue1 Active Member 10 Years

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    Thanks for the advice.

    Sue
     
  19. sue1

    sue1 Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi. Regarding my message of last year re Hydrangea Petiolaris, I can say that it survived the winter admirably. I wrapped the whole pot it in bubble wrap, placing wood mulch on top, and it is now growing like crazy, and I can even see little flower heads forming! I'm so pleased. Thanks for the advice regarding "slow growth", as I think otherwise I would have just chucked it out.

    However, I'm concerned as it's just in a large pot - could I transfer it back into the grounds now, or wait for awhile?

    Thanks, Sue
     
  20. Tennyo

    Tennyo Member

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    Hard to say without knowing your climate better. Based on it's hardiness, I am confident though that if your nighttime temps do not go lower than 35-40 degrees F your plant will be fine. Do consider that with well developed flowerheads your plant is using lots of its energy right now and root disturbance will affect they way it draws water and nutrients from the soil it is in. With very young flowerheads transplanting would likely be ok, I probably would wait unitl after it flowers to move it, without seeing the plant it is hard to decide, what does it tell you?
     
  21. sue1

    sue1 Active Member 10 Years

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    I think I'll leave it in the pot for now, only because it appears very happy. After flowering (as you suggest) I'll plant into the ground. Thanks for the advice!

    Sue
     

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