How do you rebloom a Phal?

Discussion in 'Orchidaceae (orchids)' started by orchid10, Oct 17, 2007.

  1. orchid10

    orchid10 Member

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver, CAN
    How does everyone promote their Phal to begin producing a new spike after it has had a chance to rest?
    I have heard it needs a couple weeks of cooler temperatures, but short of putting it outside how do you recommend doing this indoors?
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,989
    Likes Received:
    679
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Did you cut the old spike off?
     
  3. orchid10

    orchid10 Member

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver, CAN
    Sure did. The plant is in good condition and I suppose the old spike was cut off 5 months ago. In the meanwhile there is a new leaf and several new roots that have appeared.

    Suggestions?
     
  4. arcticshaun

    arcticshaun Active Member

    Messages:
    137
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Yellowknife, NWT, Canada
    I grow under lights so I don't see much seasonal temperature change (slightly warmer when I begin to heat my home in the fall). Some Phals respond to lower nighttime temps by flowering (probably inherited from parents that would have initiated flowering after rainy season) and growers who can easily control temps can increase the flower count by maintaining these nighttime temps for a longer period. My Phals flower randomly throughout the year as the they build up the 'energy' to flower (Phalaenopsis orchids have no storage bulb like some other species). Another trick is periodic watering with epsom salts at a rate of 1 tablespoon per 5 gallons of water (I do this about every 3 months on all my orchids). A healthy plant can initiate flowers several times a year and be in bloom for months at a time while forcing or tricking a plant into bloom more often can weaken the plant. If your orchid is putting out new leaves and roots your already on the right track.

    Shaun
     
  5. RoseAnne

    RoseAnne Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    South Florida
    Hi: While my knowledge of orchids is limited, I believe that Ron B was asking if you cut the spike off for a reason. Sometimes, the entire spike will turn brown after blooming, in which case it is a good thing that you cut it off. Other times, most of the spike remains green and is alive and therefore will eventually produce more flowers on that spike. In that case, only the brown portion should be trimmed away.

    Further, some phal varieties may only produce flowers once a year, while others may produce more often. Mature phals may have multiple spikes and even multiple stems (no doubt the wrong term for this anatomical feature!) on the spikes. Cold temperatures will be key to formation of new spikes. Of course, a healthy plant, well nourished and with the right amounts of sunlight will also be important....
     
  6. orchid10

    orchid10 Member

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver, CAN
    My biggest challenge is to find a cold place in the house to put the plant that's not drafty to so cold that it will kill the plant. I bet it will happen on it's own as long as it's healthy.

    The spike was green when I cut it for the second time (just ahead of a node the first time to see if it would bloom again). It has been 2 months and nothing has happened so I figured it was time to cut it completely. Within 1 week a new leaf appeared and 2 new roots. Exciting!
     
  7. orchid10

    orchid10 Member

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver, CAN
    I just noticed a small spike-like growth coming out of the bottom. So far it doesn't look like any of the roots that have previously grown so I may have some luck here!

    How long until it flowers? 5 months?
     

Share This Page