How do you kill an extremely invasive tree?

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Olafhenny, Jun 3, 2014.

  1. Olafhenny

    Olafhenny Active Member 10 Years

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    How do you kill an extremely invasive tree?

    I planted this thing, because I loved its picturesque shapes and the flaming gold and red
    leaves in fall

    I cannot remember its name right now, but I cannot wait until it comes back to me. The
    tree is now invading the neighbour’s yard and I have to do something.

    Here are a couple of pictures (sorry, I for got how to upload to this site):

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/lungwitz/14315842346/

    and
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/lungwitz/14338982685/in/photostream/


    Ripping it out is probably not a good option, because it appears that the roots left in the
    ground, will just re-grow. I believe the answer is in poisoning it. I am asking what the
    best method is to get rid of it.

    Thank you,
    Olaf



     
  2. Fruit

    Fruit New Member

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    Your pictures doesn't work. You can upload pictures at the additional options section at the bottom of the page and click on the manage attachments button.
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Sounds like a sumac (Rhus species).
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Yes, it was a Rhus (I recall from having seen the photos before). It's not an invasive -- merely locally aggressive.

    It can't handle shade, so that is one method of control. If it is invading a lawn, just keep mowing down the new shoots.
     
  5. Olafhenny

    Olafhenny Active Member 10 Years

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    Thank you for the replies. I have to apologise for the invalid URLs of the photos. My Flickr
    was set on ‘Enbed’ rather than on ‘HTML’, when I copied them from there. The trees were
    indeed Sumac. I believe that I have solved the problem by spraying the leaves with
    glysophate and by two days later scraping a 1 to 2 inches wide ring of bark of at the bases
    down to the cambium and painting that with glysopate as well. They are now showing
    signs of deteriorating.

    Thanks again,
    Olaf




     

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