How do i force (encourage) a plant to flower and fruit at a younger age?

Discussion in 'Plants: Science and Cultivation' started by Soumil Yarlagadda, Oct 1, 2022.

  1. Soumil Yarlagadda

    Soumil Yarlagadda Active Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    218
    Location:
    Rancho Santa Margarita, CA , Zone 10a
    Hello everyone, I was wondering if there was something i could apply/spray on a plant to flower and fruit earlier in its life than it usually does (say if a tree finally starts flowering 10 years after it germinated, but i can do something to make it flower much earlier). could i spray florigen/gibberellic acid on the plant?

    In short, i want to shorten the vegetative/juvenile phase of a seedling and bring it directly to flowering. could this happen?

    Thanks, Soumil
    useful links i found so far:

    Regulation of floral initiation in horticultural trees

    Shortening the juvenile phase
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2022
  2. woodschmoe

    woodschmoe Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    697
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    gulf island, bc, canada
    Look up “bark inversion”. Not a spray/substance as requested, but depending on the plant it can produce the precocious effect you’re looking for.
     
    Soumil Yarlagadda likes this.
  3. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,227
    Likes Received:
    410
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    I just did. Looks a very risky process - unless you're a well-trained grafter with plenty of experience, you're more likely to kill the tree than get the desired effect.
     
    Soumil Yarlagadda likes this.
  4. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,698
    Likes Received:
    226
    Location:
    Burnaby, Canada
    I'd never heard of bark inversion, but discovered that it is similar to, but more complicated than girdling, which I do every year on my grape vines and have tried on apple and cherry trees. From what I read, the affect of both procedures is similar; so, I'm not sure why anyone would use the more difficult one. Anyway, I've found that girdling will increase flowering the following year; and it seems to hasten ripening. In grapes it certainly increases the size of the fruit, especially for seedless grapes. I've never noticed any problems with girdling, the small gap in the cambium layer gets grown over fairly quickly.
     
    Soumil Yarlagadda likes this.
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,227
    Likes Received:
    410
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    The major difference with bark inversion is that it is potentially quickly lethal - girdling is just wounding, which it is fairly easy to recover from (though can still lead to potentially dangerous infections), where as bark inversion is like cutting someone's head off and then stitching it back on the other way round. Unless you're a really expert transplant surgeon, don't attempt this at home.
     

Share This Page