How and when to plant these in BC?

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by vicarious1, Oct 21, 2012.

  1. vicarious1

    vicarious1 Active Member 10 Years

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    Hello

    1/ How and when is it best to plant these seeds for the yellow flowers with big leaves and how. I got this perennial form garden works after I saw it at the Park near Lost Lagune. I collected the dry pods/balls (I suppose that the seeds after flowering)
    now what to do wait for spring plant each ball or only a few?

    2/ I also collected these dry (paper like, what seems to be the seeds) of these lovely blue flower that. Are these dry balls the seeds or not?

    3/ And someone gave my a Fuchsia like bush that makes MANY stunning red bloom late into the season. Last year I trimmed it short and it took a long to regrow. But by not trimming it will it grow bigger?

    I love growing plants from seeds. Thanks.
     

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  2. vitog

    vitog Contributor 10 Years

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    Re hardy Fuchsia, they die back close to the ground every winter; so you may as well prune them back at the end of the season.
     
  3. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    The first plant is Ligularia. Likes a lot of moisture and shade from the hot afternoon sun.
     
  4. Fine ocean parker

    Fine ocean parker Active Member

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    I agree with sundrop, I put one in my newly planted woodland garden this year. I will have to move it next year as it gets a little too much sun. The great thing is you will know very easily because it will wilt. Good luck with the seeds I don't have any info on that front for you.
     
  5. vicarious1

    vicarious1 Active Member 10 Years

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    Thank you.

    They grow in full sunshine in the parks in Vancouver. Any info one when to plant the seeds if these are the correct seeds I have? Thanks
     
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  6. Tree Nut

    Tree Nut Active Member

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    My two ligularia absolutely wilt in the afternoon sun unless I water them every day. Even then they still wilt somewhat. I would expect they require some cold stratification and can then be planted in the spring.
     
  7. vicarious1

    vicarious1 Active Member 10 Years

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    "Cold stratification" you mean put in the freezer dpt . For how long would that need to be?
     
  8. Tree Nut

    Tree Nut Active Member

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    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 24, 2012
  9. vicarious1

    vicarious1 Active Member 10 Years

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    Wonderfull thank you so much. HOW LONG is the period recommended?
     
  10. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Really? Is Burnaby so cold that happens?

    Fuchsia magellanica makes a fully hardy shrub up to 2-3m tall here at 55°N, not damaged even in severe winters.
     
  11. vicarious1

    vicarious1 Active Member 10 Years

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    Well 2 years ago we had -17C two nights in November without warning. And each winter we easy have one or two feet of snow.
    In spring time all the branches are there totally dry
    I did not see them shooting leaves but I did cut them back
    Are you in the area. Would you recommend me NOT cutting them back and wait out longer?
    I have managed to keep 2 pots of Fushia one pink and red and the other a white Marshmallow a live by keeping the hanging pots in the garage over winter and just adding very little water. But over the years each year more and more branches are dying off.
    PS: Still no one told me what to do with my decorative grass seeds. Do they also need to go to the fridge, and what is the best way to plant them? Even on the Net there isn't much about the HOW TO DO .
    I am also very surprised that my Poppy plants start growing leaves again before the winter my leaves are now nearly one foot long again.
    Thanks a lot
     
  12. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    OK, that's significantly colder than here – the absolute minimum here is -13°C, and anything below -8° is rare.
     
  13. cagreene

    cagreene Active Member

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    the fuchsia's will dry out, but much to my surprise, they sprouted new leaves from even the most dried up shoots, it just took longer...( last fall i had been too ill to prune back the bushes, and forgot to do it in the spring) very happy to see they regenerate.
     

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  14. vicarious1

    vicarious1 Active Member 10 Years

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    yes same here. took much more long time and they actually are still flowering now..and they are in a shade spot..but over the years there are fewer branches but they seem to get longer and hang down like a few vines
     
  15. abgardeneer

    abgardeneer Active Member

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    With respect to the 4th, 5th and 6th photos, the plant is Cupid's dart, Catanche caerulea, and yes, you have dried seedheads there.
     
  16. vicarious1

    vicarious1 Active Member 10 Years

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    So how can I plant them?
    Must I put it in the fridge or not and if so for how long?
    Will they multiply for years to come?
    They make a pretty bushy sort of bunch.

    I have a very dry area near a stone retainer wall.

    It leads to the neighbors (their land is 2m lower)
    so the water escapes easy .

    I have noticed these flowers grow easy even when not watered.
    So I want to plant them there mixed into other perrenials.

    Thanks for taking the time to reply. Much appreciated.
     
  17. abgardeneer

    abgardeneer Active Member

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    I've never grown Catananche caerulea intentionally from seed (it does self-seed, of course), but the attached site suggests it's an easy, warm germinator - in other words, it does not need stratification. The easiest thing is to just scatter seeds and let "nature" (or should I say plant biology) take its course, but if you want to start them indoors, just put seeds on top of moist medium (i.e. a pot with potting soil) at room temperature and cover the pot to keep it moist until germination. Then, if you're growing indoors, you'll need a good light source... a very significant cause of failure for people growing seeds indoors is inadequate light.

    http://www.tsflowers.com/seeds/catananche_caerulea_seeds.html

    Yes, it will multiply for years to come, by self-seeding. All plants, so long as the conditions for growth, pollination, seed maturation and germination allow it, will self-seed - there's no magic to it, it's just what plants do to propagate themselves.
     
  18. abgardeneer

    abgardeneer Active Member

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    By the way, Ligularia spp. often don't require stratification. You can just follow the same advice as above for "easy, warm germinators". If you don't see germination in about a month, moving the pots (or trays or baggies or whatever you use) into a cold environment (coldroom or refrigerator - not a freezer) for 2-3 weeks, then back into room temperature, can often trigger germination. (If you don't get germination, it may be that the seeds you collected were not mature enough.)

    My standard recommendation to anyone who wants to grow perennials from seed is to read the publications of Dr. Norm Deno. (Reading this scientific reference first will be extremely valuable, since there is so much nonsensical, anecodotal, random hearsay out there about seed germination!)
    Links to his publications are here on the North American Rock Garden Society site:

    http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?PHPSESSID=a7pr7a2ujvhkpuehefcn232ak4&topic=466.msg4748#new
     
  19. vicarious1

    vicarious1 Active Member 10 Years

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    Thank you so much . That sounds all very interesting. So if the plant self seeds means that the seeds fall to the ground outdoors BEFORE winter and the start growing in spring. I don't want to start growing inside. I wanted to know should I keep the seeds indoor and then plant in spring ( with or without refrigeration).
    I think my seeds very very good because I September was VERY dry and I left them on the stem for many many weeks even them being dry already.. I just caught them before they started falling. My initial ones are growing an large planter two feet wide and three feet deep. Will try to the reading you recommend. ...
    So actually IF I scatter them slightly under de soil OUTSIDE now they may also grow next year.
     
  20. abgardeneer

    abgardeneer Active Member

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    Yes, that's how plants reproduce themselves naturally by seed... except no one helps out by covering them with soil.
    You can increase the odds a bit in your favour by scratching the seeds into the surface of the soil if you like... it prevents the seeds being blown or washed away, and may help to keep them moist for germination.
     
  21. soccerdad

    soccerdad Active Member 10 Years

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    Michael, I live near the UBC botanical garden - so I must live between 5 and 10 miles west of Vicarious, who lives in Burnaby - and it has never fallen below -13C in my yard to my knowledge. And I have never seen more than maybe 6" of snow on the ground. This, although I have lived in my house for 35 years. But having said that, my fuchsia M (one of which was growing here when I moved in) die to the ground every winter. I will watch them this year but I think they die between -5C and -10C.
     
  22. vicarious1

    vicarious1 Active Member 10 Years

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    Well here on Willingdon height we had -17 in NOV 2 years ago..but I had my Fushia in garage already. And this year they are still somwhat blooming I even still have some Echineas blooming its crazy.
     
  23. soccerdad

    soccerdad Active Member 10 Years

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    My echinaceas bit the dust long ago. But my banana is still happy.
     
  24. vicarious1

    vicarious1 Active Member 10 Years

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    hahah..what are you saying
    my Bananas are already wrapped up and happy in burlap and plastic
    MUCH to early I was just concerned a few years ago I lost 1/2 of them
    so I take no chances
     
  25. soccerdad

    soccerdad Active Member 10 Years

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    Thought that I'd go to the Environment Canada website which shows the high and low temperature each day for years. Here is what their web site says for Vancouver in November during the last two decades (all temperatures are in Celsius):

    2012. Lowest temp was -0.9 on Nov 26

    2011. Lowest temp was -4.3 on Nov 20

    2010. Lowest temp was -9.5 on Nov 23; there were two other days below -5

    2009. Lowest temp was -0.4 on Nov 14

    2008. Lowest temp was -0.3 on Nov 24

    2007. Lowest temp was -3.3 on both Nov 22 and 30

    2006. Lowest temp was -12 overnight on Nov 28; there were two other days below -5. There was snow on the ground for 4 days in a row, reaching a maximum of almost 10" on November 30. But the snow melted rapidly and there were only 5 days in the following month when the temperature fell below 0 at night (the lowest temp that December was -3.0 on December 3). There were only 3 days in the 13 previous years in which there was any snow on the ground in November.

    2005. Lowest temp was -2.2 on Nov 28

    2004. Lowest temp was -2.5 on Nov 28

    2003. Lowest temp was -4.6 on Nov 6

    2002. Lowest temp was -3.7 on Nov 3

    2001. Lowest temp was -1.0 on Nov 18

    2000. Lowest temp was -3.6 on Nov 17

    1999. Lowest temp was -0.1 on Nov 2

    1998. Lowest temp was +1.7 on Nov 17

    1997. Lowest temp was -2.5 on Nov 13

    1996. Lowest temp was -6.6 on Nov 23; there was one other day below -5

    1995. Lowest temp was -2.4 on Nov 2

    1994. Lowest temp was -3.7 on Nov 21

    1993. Lowest temp was -9.3 on Nov 23; there were three other days below -5

    It looks like Burnaby is way way colder than Vancouver for as I said I have never seen temperatures in Vancouver like Vicarious cites for Burnaby.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2012

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