Hope for honeybees.

Discussion in 'Celebrate Biodiversity' started by togata57, Apr 7, 2022.

  1. togata57

    togata57 Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Researchers found that when the bees were bred to identify and remove the Varroa mites – which can feed and live on adults but mostly target larvae – there was a two-fold increase in colony survival.

    Managed bees sometimes respond to mites (which reproduce in the cells of bee larvae) by expelling infested larvae – killing both the larvae and the mites, in a behaviour known as Varroa-sensitive hygiene (VSH).

    By selectively breeding for this trait, colonies can be produced that automatically protect themselves from infestation, while maintaining large colony sizes and ample honey production.

    New breed of honey bee has been bred to resist its greatest parasite | Daily Mail Online
     
    ShelleyLou, Acerholic and Sulev like this.
  2. Sulev

    Sulev Contributor

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    That's a good news!
    I used to practice bee keeping, but lost all my hives for unknown reason. Infection with the Varroa-mites is one likely cause.
     
  3. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Indeed good news, I have friends who have lost many hives over the past several years. We all need to keep our fingers crossed that this breeding program does work.
     

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