Hoophouse planting

Discussion in 'Plants: Science and Cultivation' started by rydods, Jan 8, 2008.

  1. rydods

    rydods Member

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    Location:
    Northern Wisconsin
    Hello, I am new here and a first time grower. I live in Northern WI Zone 5 I believe, and would love to begin a new small business growing berries in hoophouses all year long. Blueberries and Blackberries have been hard to come by and Strawberries grown by farmers in the spring are usually full of pesticides. In the winter these berries are very pricey in the stores. However I am concerned about the obvious questions such as pollination, heat during the winter, or how long some of the many types of berries take to produce and probably other questions I may need answering. Can anyone help me with this delema or is outdoor growing my better option? Thanks,

    Ryan
     
  2. Just Curious

    Just Curious Active Member

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    Location:
    New Westminster BC
    Growing blueberrries and blackberries in tunnels is just starting as an industry in British Columbia. I've also seen everbearing strawberries and cherries. Not many acres in yet because of the cost of the tunnels (around $30,000/a) but it's expanding every year.
    There is better pollination and much less need for spraying. Seasons can be extended and fruit can be picked rain or shine.
    The tunnels I've seen used here are made by Haygrove.
     
  3. growest

    growest Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Surrey,BC,Canada
    Strawberries in tunnels is so popular in the UK that there has been public criticism...too much of the countryside covered in shiny plastic must detract from the esthetics of their landscape. This must demonstrate, tho, that it is a viable idea.

    Like you, I'm curious about pollination...as long as the pollinators can come and go, it is true they may pollinate better under cover thanks to the drier and warmer environment.
     

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