Honeycrisp apple tree

Discussion in 'Fruit and Nut Trees' started by leafclimber, Feb 22, 2007.

  1. leafclimber

    leafclimber Member

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    I already have 2 apple trees (Akane & Cox Orange Pippin) in my yard but would like to add a third. A local grocery store has plastic bagged bare root dwarf Honeycrisp and Braeburn apple trees for $15. Should I avoid buying one of these since they are small and so cheap? Will this little tree grow as well as a $25-35 tree that they sell at the local nursery? It is definitely smaller than the pricier trees but since I am planning on training it into a 2 or 3 tier espalier perhaps it doesn't matter.

    Also if anyone has some advice for growing Honeycrisp in the Seattle, WA area I would love to hear it. I grew Braeburn at my previous home and it produced many apples though it seemed like they never ripened very well. Not sure if Honeycrisp will do any better.

    Thanks!
     
  2. silver_creek

    silver_creek Active Member

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    Honeycrisp does ripen in Western WA, tho Braeburn does not. You will take a chance on the grocery store trees- may be fine, may not. And what rootstock are they on- the term 'dwarf' means different things to different people.
     
  3. leafclimber

    leafclimber Member

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    Happy to hear that Honeycrisp does ripen in Western Washington. I did look at the plastic bag for rootstock information and didn't see any information listed. I might have to go back and check again. I assume that getting a dwarf would be best for a 2 or 3 tier espalier so that I am not fighting to keep it small. Thanks for the reply.
     
  4. silver_creek

    silver_creek Active Member

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    For espalier, the smaller the rootstock, the better. M-26, M-9 or even M-27 (smallest) mean much less pruning in your future.
     
  5. leafclimber

    leafclimber Member

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    Thanks again for your replies. I tried to determine which rootstock was used but didn't get responses from the grower... they are a commercial grower so may not appreciate calls from home gardeners. I'll just give it a try. At $15 it was hard to pass up especially since it already has two opposite lower branches for the first tier. I'll plant it this weekend and prune the trunk to get the next tier of branches going.

    A few questions.

    1) It will be at the base of a south facing rock wall, grown in 2-3 tiers. Does planting it 8-10" from the base of the wall sound about right?

    2) I was planning on stringing guidwires from two posts or pipes placed 5-6' from the trunk to train the branches. How does that sound?

    3) The pipes or posts. I was thinking of using 1.5-2" pipes and then mounting some homemade mason bee blocks on top. I'll also be building some sort of frame or 'T' posts to drape netting over the blueberries as well. Does anyone have ideas for how to make these functional garden frames/structures more artistic/attractive?

    4) If this tree ends up too vigorous I could move it or perhaps graft one or more cuttings onto my other trees. Is it legal to graft cuttings of a Honeycrisp or other patented plant to replace the original plant in ones yard. I wouldn't be propogating it to make money or even to share with someone.

    5) If you cut a branch back below any of its side branches (i.e. all of its lower branches had been pruned back to the main branch in prior years), from where will new growth/branches emerge? Basically where are the dormant buds on an apple tree?

    I am so excited to plant this tree! So many questions, which I should have probably split up into different forums. Thanks for your replies.
     

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