himalayan blue poppy??

Discussion in 'Annuals, Biennials, Perennials, Ferns and Bulbs' started by dustylanes, Sep 22, 2008.

  1. dustylanes

    dustylanes Member

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    has anybody been successfull with the blue poppy? i bought one in the spring, its still alive, but it hasn't grown any bigger.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Cool position, rich most soil, good drainage, protection from mites and slugs. From high altitudes in monsoon climate region, where they grow in the open but it is rainy and cloudy in summer. Seedlings of M. betonicifolia (the most common one) should be prevented from flowering their first time. So handled these are likely to form offshoots and become perennial. Otherwise they may die after only a single flowering.
     
  3. dustylanes

    dustylanes Member

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    thanks for the info i guess its a good thing the plant was stunted, maybe it will come back next year with a vengence?
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Happy specimens produce taller spikes with more flowers. Try to figure out what is wrong with yours and make it happy. Maybe it needs better soil or has a mite problem.
     
  5. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    It's a bit of a bitter sweet experience growing this plant.

    1. It's a short lived perennial - the longest survivor I have had lasted 3 years. I start a new crop from seeds every year, but stopped 3 years ago when I got too busy.
    2. It hates hot summers - which is a problem for us here in Coquitlam - the high 20's to low 30's C in July is not well tolerated. The successful ones are in the coolest spot in the garden, the north side of a large cedar.
    3. When it blooms, it becomes clear why I even tried. There are very few blues like a Himalayan poppy blue. All that frustration, pampering and waiting all of a sudden seems worthwhile!
     

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