Hibiscus plant stopped flowering after May 30 and some leaves look dull

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by RJARPCGP, Aug 12, 2012.

  1. RJARPCGP

    RJARPCGP Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA(Springfield, Vermont)
    Could this be from lack of fertilizer? The hibiscus was doing real good in the winter.

    While I got a flower on January 27, 2012, during February, during March, during April and during May. Since June 1, ZERO flowers!
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,761
    Likes Received:
    580
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Maybe it is getting too hot/dry.
     
  3. RJARPCGP

    RJARPCGP Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA(Springfield, Vermont)
    Still zero flowers and some leaves looked dull, like malnourishment. :(
     
  4. Dave-Florida

    Dave-Florida Active Member

    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vero Beach, Fla., USA
    I'd worry mostly about the leaves. Hibiscuses grown outdoors are somewhat seasonal in flowering, and it's quite normal for a plant to just have leaves. They prosper in full sun.
     
  5. Insectivore

    Insectivore Active Member

    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    zone 6b US
    Is it tropical? I assume it is since it is indoors over the winter. If so, it might be getting too much direct light. They don't need anymore than 6 hours a day. They can survive that but make sure they get watered a lot when it is really hot outside!!! I know that by now it will be inside again (when I brought mine inside this time, they seemed really happy about it and put like ten flowers out then stopped flowering for the winter. Lol.) by now, but hopefully this will help for next summer. (If it is hardy and not tropical than it needs quite a bit of sun!) And, yes, fertilizer will help - a flowering fertilizer will be best.
     
  6. Dave-Florida

    Dave-Florida Active Member

    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vero Beach, Fla., USA
    It's not quite tropical but dies back in freezing temperatures. The Flora of China says it's strictly a cultivated plant, but lists provinces where it thrives outdoors and mentions that farther north, hibiscuses come indoors for the winter. Cultivated hibiscuses may include parentage from other species, including hibiscuses native to Hawaii and other Pacific islands.

    Well-established plants in Florida recover well after cold damage, and in fact the plants are best managed by periodically cutting them back.

    Hibiscuses thrive in full sun, and like being watered and fertilized.
     
  7. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    3,510
    Likes Received:
    233
    Location:
    sw USA
    I do not grow Hibiscus here, but the American Hibiscus Society offers this advice:
    http://www.trop-hibiscus.com/bfertins.html. Most bloom food contains high amounts of phosphorus, but this is not recommended for Hibiscus. I have found similar recommendations on more commercial websites. Some seem to favor high nitrogen in early spring and high potassium for later fertilizing.

    Hibiscus are also prone to many pests and diseases that can harm flowering. There are also links to some great websites dealing with pest problems on the AHS webpage above.

    As I said I do not grow Hibiscus here, I don't have the light or space, but I would be curious to hear from Hibiscus growers if this fertilizer recommendation seems valid to them.
     
  8. Insectivore

    Insectivore Active Member

    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    zone 6b US
    Oh yea, sorry, i forgot to mention that. I try to stay away from phosphorus too. I actually do that period though. Would prefer the Micorizal (sp?) fungi to grow. Phosphorus (I understand) harnesses that. ....
     

Share This Page