Help with my Lime Tree!

Discussion in 'Citrus' started by BenJoeM, Jun 20, 2006.

  1. skeeterbug

    skeeterbug Active Member

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    I believe it was Millet that said that those side limbs are important to the development of the trunk, so unless they are a problem in some way, I think I would leave them.

    Skeet
     
  2. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    If they are above the graft leave them alone. If they are below the graft, rub them out. - Millet
     
  3. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    It's likely all that remains is the rootstock.
     
  4. BenJoeM

    BenJoeM Member

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    So is there consensus I should clip them. They are below the graft since there is no longer a graft. I wan the root stock to grow very strong so I can graft it again. Some one told me I could use the other branches as future rootstock as well.

    What do you think? Or should I just clip them.
     
  5. skeeterbug

    skeeterbug Active Member

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    I'm not sure what rootstock you have, it is certainly not a trifoliate. It could be an edible fruit that was used as a rootstock, it has fairly wide petiole wings, so it is not lemon. Maybe someone else can ID it. As for the side branches, if you are going to graft, you can use them for different varieties if you want a cocktail tree.
     
  6. BenJoeM

    BenJoeM Member

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    I believe it is a Sour Orange Root Stock from the leaves.
     
  7. drichard12

    drichard12 Active Member 10 Years

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    If the root stock took over, you could graft another to it. using a cleaf or t- budding
     

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