Help with Kiwis.

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by Panoply, Oct 26, 2012.

  1. Panoply

    Panoply Member

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    I don't mean New Zealanders. I bought a kiwi plant today, but discovered once I was home it needs a pollinating partner. What plants are suitable for this?

    Also, where/how should I plant it. I put it in the ground, not knowing any better. Should I dig it up and pot it in a large pot? Does it require a trellis? Would a 2x8 wooden lattice work? It sure would seem unattractive using it though - unless the Kiwi covers all of it. Would planting it next to hurricane fencing be OK?

    Is it a vine or what?

    Sun? Shade? Partial sun?

    Basically, please tell me everything I need to know to grow this Kiwi plant. I had never seen one until today and have no idea what I'm doing. You help is GREATLY appreciated!

    Thanks,
    Jeremy/Panoply
     
  2. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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  3. Panoply

    Panoply Member

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    Help with potential pollinators.

    IYesterday, I bought a Kiwi plant not knowing it needed a pollinator. The name of the Kiwi plant I have says only 'Male and Female Kiwi.'
    There are four potential pollinators for my plant. I tried for a solid 20 minutes trying to find any of them for sale. I gave up and returned some time later and spent what seemed an eon looking (probably another 20-25 minutes). If you can tell me where I might buy them, I'd appreciate it.
    They are:
    Alabama Male
    Arctic Male
    Issai
    Meader Male
     
  4. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Re: Help with potential pollinators.

    How do you know that the plant you bought needs a pollinator? If the label is correct, and the plant is both male and female; then it should be self-fertile. Issai seems to be the most common self-fertile Kiwi in these parts.
     
  5. Panoply

    Panoply Member

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    Re: Help with potential pollinators.

    Oh.... It din't make much sense to me, either. The pollinator requirement was on the back of the card.

    THANKS
     
  6. Panoply

    Panoply Member

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    The colloquial name of this species? What are good fruit choices?

    What isthe colloquial name of this species? The scientific name is: Actinidia arguta.

    Thanks, guys. I am very much an amateur gardener and know no one, personally, that I may ask. I like growing fruit bearing trees, shrubs, vines etc. I've got Orange, Lemon, Lime and fig trees. Blueberry bushes as well. What else is a good choice for where I am? <Baton Rouge, La>

    Thanks a bunch,
    jeremy
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Re: The colloquial name of this species? What are good fruit choices?

    Hardy kiwi.
     
  8. Panoply

    Panoply Member

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    I appreciate your help & response.

    I bought a kiwi plant on, basically, on an impulse. I had no idea of the complexity of growing this vine. A very kind lady sent me a doc from Just Fruits & Exotics which seems to have all the info I need to grow a fruit bearing kiwi.
    My question is, just hpw difficult is it to plant, keep it going and have it bear fruit is it? This no doubt is the question of a dilettante, a bit puerile even. Still, all answers are welcome. I'm determined to make it work - even though it seems I must visit a hardware/lumber store and wait 3 years for fruit! So, ease of cultivation? Any tips to head off amateur mistakes?
    Ignorant of the proper procedure, I pu it in the ground already in an unsuitable spot for what is required. This was 2 days ago, though. Dig it up? What special steps, if any, are needed to have it up out of the ground again?

    Thanks & God Bless!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 30, 2012
  9. woodschmoe

    woodschmoe Active Member 10 Years

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    These are tough vines, which will bear fruit with little effort on your part. Provided they are given a good start (planted in a good location with something to climb, and a good covering of mulch), you can just sit back and wait for them to bear. As these will climb 100' up trees in their 'native' habitat, the main consideration is their vigour: make sure they have enough room, and know that in most cases you will have to engage in some pruning down the road. Otherwise, plant them and let 'em go.
     
  10. Panoply

    Panoply Member

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    Thanks! That sounds much easier!
     
  11. Panoply

    Panoply Member

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    I am doing a lor of reading, preparing to plant two kiwi. I continuously come across a reference that in order for their to be fruit, a plant of each gender must be present. I bought my Kiwi as they said 'Male/Female Kiwi.' This, I assumed, meant that the plants I'd bought can self generate fruit. I am now having doubts. Perhaps the label meant that the grower themselves didn't look up any skirts and so put'Male/Fenale' as a sort o caveat emptor.
    What are you alls opinion? The nursery hasn't a clue, taking the attitude 'We just work here.' Are there hermaphrodite kiwi? If not, how do you determine sex?

    Thanks a Milion,
    Jeremy/Panoply

    One more thing....again. I am in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Zone 5. Plant now, correct?

    As Always,
    Thanks
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 4, 2012
  12. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Re: Kiwis, One More Thing

    As mentioned previously, Issai is a self-fertile Hardy Kiwi variety; i.e., the flowers have both male and female parts (stamens and pistils). Google some images if you don't know the difference.

    The only way to determine sex is to look at the flowers. Note that female plants have infertile (usually) stamens and pistils, and male plants have stamens only. And yes, fall planting in Louisiana is good.
     
  13. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Merged threads (again)
     
  14. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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  15. Panoply

    Panoply Member

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    Wow. Thanks Saltceder. Where on earth I got zone 5 from I do not know. I remember finding it on the net some months ago. lol I'm truly not a stupid man, I went to collage and gots my degree in histree and socialanalogy.
    Back to seriousness, I hope this doesn't affect what I've already done.
     

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