Help - Rose Bush out of control

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by tericuff, Jun 21, 2008.

  1. tericuff

    tericuff Member

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    I have a Floribunda Rose Bush that was pruned in the spring and it has gone crazy. It has new growth that has shot out about 3 feet wide and almost as tall. The new growth is small stems and looks like it would not hold a rose but. I don't know if I should prune it now or what to do. I could take some pictures if that would help.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Probably rootstock sprouts that should be cut out.
     
  3. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    yes, please post some pics before you do anything to the bush.
     
  4. tericuff

    tericuff Member

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    Here are some pictures hopefully someone can help me with this monster rosebush!
     

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  5. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    it doesn't look out of control at all! you've just got the normal growth after a heavy pruning.

    i'd leave it be and let it do whatever it's going to do. the stems are much sturdier than they look and i doubt there's going to be a problem with any blooms that appear. you can get a 'fan' type trellis and put that behind it to support the canes - either weave the stems into the trellis or use plastic twist ties to attach them to the support.

    in the fall, i usually trim back the tallest bits - really just a matter of 'tipping' the ends so that everything is at one height. then i mulch with crushed leaves to protect the roots. in spring, around st. pat's day, i do a real pruning (and remove the crushed leaves).

    the first couple of years i had the roses, i'd take them down to 2 feet tall - getting rid of the upper growth allows the base of the canes to grow thick and sturdy. as the years have gone on, i've allowed them to stay a little taller - not i only prune back to 3 feet tall.

    all the roses get nice, full new growth each year.
     
  6. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

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    Looks like a climbing variety to me.
     
  7. tericuff

    tericuff Member

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    My daughter in law gave me two rose bushes for mother's day 4 years ago and this is the first year this one has grown this large. I don't believe it is a climbing rose. She got them at KMart. I never believed they would last this long but they have been great. I have attached a picture of the other rose bush and this one has one rose on it and 9 buds. They were in the exact packaging.
     

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  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Since all of the flowerless one is the same if it is the rootstock you have lost the scion (the rose that was grafted onto it). Growing that tall without flowering whatever the non-conformist is it won't be a Floribunda.
     
  9. tericuff

    tericuff Member

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    Ron B,
    Thanks for your help but I am really a novice when it comes to roses. If you could help me and explain a little more about what you mean then maybe I would understand what you are talking about. Sorry I don't know so much about roses, I don't have a green thumb at all when it comes to roses.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2008
  10. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Here is what Ron is trying to tell you.

    Commercial rose growers will "graft" a bud of an ornamental variety of rose (the "scion") on to another rose (the "rootstock"). The budding is done low down on the rootstock plant. When the bud "takes" and starts to grow, the rootstock plant is pruned, or cut off above the budded scion. The result is a plant that is the sum of two. The root system is that of the root stock. The upper part that comprises the stems, leaves and flowers is that of the decorative rose scion.

    The rootstock is chosen for the qualities of it's root system, not for any ornamental value. The commonly used variety for most parts of the US is Dr. Huey, which is a once blooming climber with medium sized double red flowers. In the south, Rosa Fortuniana is the preferred rootstock. Canadian rose producers tend to use Rosa multiflora. A less frequently used rootstock is Manetti (more commonly in commercial greenhouse rose industry).

    The problem with grafted roses is that the rootstock plant is still a plant on it's own right. The ornamental scion is just "hitching a ride" on the rootstock plant. Some rootstock plants, Dr. Huey in particularly, tend to produce shoots of it's own, either from the stem below the location of the grafted rose (the "bud union"), or even from the roots. These are called "suckers". When these are allowed to grow, they dominate vegetative top growth, and over time, crowd out and overwhelm the desired grafted ornamental rose variety (the scion).

    What Ron is pointing out is that if those "unusual" shoots do not behave or look like or bear flowers that are of the original decorative rose that you bought, then you likely have lost the original rose. He is explaining that most floribundas do not grow that tall without producing flowers, which suggest that the unusually tall shoots you see are from the rootstock and not from the decorative scion.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2008
  11. tericuff

    tericuff Member

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    Thank you for the explanation Weekend Gardener. Do you think it would do any good to trim it at this time or just leave it until fall??
     
  12. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    All suckers from rootstocks should be removed as soon as they are identified, so that they do not compete with the decorative budded rose. This can be done at any time of the year and as soon as you see them emerge. It is important to remove them from as close to the rootstock material and as completely as possible.
     
  13. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

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    How can you tell the difference between a good stem and a sucker on a climbing rose bush...ie; Dr. Huey?
     
  14. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

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    I'll take a shoot at answering that question. Generally suckers will have more than 5 leaflet on a leaf more like nine and a lot smaller. They will be quite different from the graft in size and colour. Personally I prefer own root roses.
     
  15. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

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    Thanks Greg, that really does help me. So once I locate the sucker, can you tell me how to remove it?
     
  16. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

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    They generally just keep popping up. When you first plant the bush you should bury the crown deep enough to let the roots grow under the soil deep enough so that they don't surface. Sometimes while tilling you can scatch the roots and cause suckers to grow out of the wound. Some roses just sucker badly I have a moss rose that does this on it's own root.
     
  17. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

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    Thanks Greg, that is good to know when I plant another rose. This particular rose (Dr. Huey) has been there for several years. I took some cuttings from it yesterday and now I'm just sitting here looking at them and wondering how does one root a rose stem?
     

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