Help in Identifing this Tree

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by kinnika, May 12, 2007.

  1. kinnika

    kinnika Active Member

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    About 3 years ago we were given 3 tiny trees. No one had any idea what they were well they have done very well and this year they are blooming. So I really would like to know what they are as we are getting tired of calling them "Don't Knows" I think I have seen this tree before but I have no idea what it might be..Thank you in advance for any help anyone can give.
     

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  2. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Serviceberry, Amelanchier Sp. perhaps?

    HTH
    Chris
     
  3. kinnika

    kinnika Active Member

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    No it isn't serviceberry ( Saskatoon) I have lots of them in the yard and they are quite similiar but the blossoms are not the same.
     
  4. TonyR

    TonyR Active Member

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  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I'd say probably Prunus serotina (Black Cherry; one of the "related deciduous species" that TonyR talks of). The leaves are the wrong shape for Prunus padus itself, too long-pointed at the apex.
     
  6. kinnika

    kinnika Active Member

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    THAT'S IT!!!!!! THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU both of you..I appreciate this SO much...YIPEE!!!!! I have cherry trees in my yard....(Doing the happy dance here.)
     
  7. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Don't get too excited! The fruit aren't really edible, very sour and bitter. The best you can do with them is make jam or jelly with them, adding lots of sugar.
     
  8. kinnika

    kinnika Active Member

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    Oh Michael I don't really care whether they are edible or not. I am sure the birds (which I have a lot in my yard ) will just love them. And besides they are very pretty..Thanks again
     
  9. Weedbender

    Weedbender Active Member 10 Years

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    I thought perhaps Prunus virginiana , Chokecherry
     
  10. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    I second the nomination of chokecherry.
     
  11. kinnika

    kinnika Active Member

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    No it is definetly not chokecherry..I have those also and although the leaf is very similiar the flower is definetly different.
     
  12. dmurchie

    dmurchie Member

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    I have an almost identical tree... and flowers...

    My tree is a ringer for a black cherry, however it doesn't loose its leaves in the winter like a good black cherry should. It mature leaves are also shiny like a bay laurel, although with a variegated edge, and shaped more like a spade.

    So, despite the similarity in summer appearance to a black cherry, I suspect that my black cherry is actually a cherry laurel tree (Prunus laurocerasus). (Let me know if anyone knows of a black cherry which keeps its leaves and grows nicely into a 15-20' tree in about as many years.

    I will post pictures once the flowers open.
     
  13. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Certainly sounds like it. This is a very popular tree in mild (zone 8-9) areas.
     

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