Help identifying leaves infestation

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by Wandering Bee, Jul 31, 2020.

  1. Wandering Bee

    Wandering Bee New Member

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    Hello, would appreciate some help on identifying what appears to be an infestation on a lace cap Viburnum bush, Please see pic, the white elongated tubular like , sticky Infestation has taken over quite a bit of this bush .. I have seen pics of Mealy Bug larvae, but those show white round puffs, these are worm like white sticky, And the leaf shown is just a small amount , some leaves it completely covers the leaves.....thank you for any help!

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  2. Arlette

    Arlette Active Member

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    Palestrina - Rome (Italy)
    I think it may be Lichtensia viburni (Cottony scale of the olive), host plants: Olivo, Lentisco, Mirto, Viburno, Edera.
    If you agree on this type of mealybug you can intervene with a good white oil (doses of the label), but the success is greater if you go to hit the youthful shapes that come out of the egg bag, therefore the timing is important, which in the case in question is June (1st generation) and again September / October (2nd generation).
    At the agricultural level, in reality, there is a tendency not to intervene with insecticides, simply to eliminate the most infested parts and to administer a cupric product to prevent the formation of fumages (development of a fungal black patina on the sugar sludge caused by the stings of mealybugs), however in your case, I would say that a harmless intervention with summer white oil, with a high degree of insulponability (eg. Oliocin at 1-1.5%, easily available for gardening also from us) could be sufficient.
     
    Wandering Bee and Acerholic like this.
  3. Wandering Bee

    Wandering Bee New Member

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    Hi there. It’s definitely nothing I’ve ever seen before. Are these native to North America and Vancouver Island? I have found more on the same bush and the underside of the leaves are completely covered in these white cotton things. Maybe take out and burn the shrub?
     
  4. Arlette

    Arlette Active Member

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    If I really wanted to keep the plant at all costs, I would make the most of the foliage inside so as to create an environment unsuitable for the development of mealybugs in general even if this is a preventive action, I would eliminate and burn any vegetable residue of pruning and, finally, I would treat with white oil.
    But if you consider that the plant is too run down to avoid the spread of the infestation, I would eliminate it also considering that such a large number of individuals should have generated so much honeydew that the fumage that fatally derives from it could have caused the action of photosynthesis of the leaves should be extremely compromised.
    I'm sorry I can't tell you more but this, unfortunately, is the situation in which your plant finds.
     

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