Identification: Help ID and then save

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by Belle, May 4, 2005.

  1. Belle

    Belle Member

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    Ok, I have this plant potted from a florist living in my office. While I was just in Japan I saw it growing along a road (these pics). When I got back, I found that no one had watered it in the office and now it's in bad shape (too embarrassing to photograph). Can anyone tell me what it is, and how to save it?

    Thanks!
     

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  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Could be Fatsia japonica, Japanese Aralia.
     
  3. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I would also vote for Fatsia japonica
     
  4. Belle

    Belle Member

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    I looked up Japanese Aralia and this looks like it. Does anyone have any experience caring for these plants? The leaves have all drooped, but haven't lost any color and aren't brittle or dry (which is why I'm holding out hope). Thanks for your help!
     
  5. Belle

    Belle Member

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    Another option... if I have in fact starved this poor plant beyond hope, can I make a cutting etc? If that's possible, I'm going to need direction; I'm a complete novice at this. Thanks again.
     
  6. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    if it has gotten real dry give it a good soak and stand the pot in a saucer of water for a couple days (only). They recover well if not gone too far. If it is done a new one can be had for a reasonable price at most garden shops.
     
  7. Marn

    Marn Active Member 10 Years

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    here is a lil bit of care for it .. i would try the soaking method and see what happend it should only take a day or 2 for it to spring back ..

    Place your "Japanese Aralia" in bright filtered light to keep a compact growth habit. In bright light they can drink a lot of water. Check for watering every 3 days or so on a new plant until you become familiar with it's water requirements. Keep the soil moist but not soggy. It's beneficial to let the plant dry to it's wilting point occasionally. Feed monthly with a balanced plant food . Fatsia's produce a dusty looking material under their leaves... do not confuse this dust as spider mites.

    u shoulda posted a pic of it so we can see if it would come back .. dont b embarrased to post a pic of a sickly looking plant ..thats what we r here for is to help them ..

    Marn
     
  8. Dillon

    Dillon Member

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    That's Aralia Fatsia Japonica. It's a beautiful plant but likes cool rainy conditions. It's related to Hedera or "Ivy" and they have been crossed but "Fatshedera" seems to be less hardy. I saw some Aralia near the wax museum in Anaheim years ago and they looked terrible. They look outstanding in Seattle outdoors or anyplace in a similar climate. I grow them in zone 6 and they need shade from the sun and may burn in a tough winter but they come back from the root. I'm told they don't root from cuttings and neither does "adult" ivy whose leaves are rounder than the younger, but if you can root Rhodies I bet you can root these. My 20 year old plant is about 4 feet tall but very tropical looking. I planted one in Seattle at my sisters from a 6" pot and was amazed to see it nearly 6' tall a year later. They like rain and cold. They produce small star like flowers like Ivy in the fall and if it isn't too cold they turn into small clusters of berries contained like, 3 or 4 to start new plants. Put yours outside and water but let drain. They burst into new leaf in the spring. If you live in zone 7 or above, plant outside or leave outside. Good Luck.

    Dillon
     

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