Heavenly Bamboo looks dead after snow storm in Vancouver

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by OIC Vancouver, Mar 10, 2022.

  1. OIC Vancouver

    OIC Vancouver New Member

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    Heavenly Bamboo (Nandina Domestica) looks dead (brown, no leaves, no spring buds) since the colder than usual Winter 2022 and the last storm storm that hit Vancouver this year. Will it come back or sprout new shoots?
     
  2. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Only time will tell; don't give up hope too quickly. It may be too early to expect to see spring buds so you can't draw any conclusions. Nandina domestica is reportedly hardy to Zone 9 and Vancouver is Zone 8a to 8b. Be patient.
     
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  3. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I'm surprised to read that - it's so commonly planted in Vancouver and looks so good, or maybe I haven't realized that it's just in the West End where I'm seeing it. The ones in the West End still had leaves and beautiful displays of fruits from last year last time I paid attention. I'll try to remember to visit some.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    These do freeze back during sharper local winters. Also, they mildew - I recommend replacement with something else. All the more so because you have discovered your site is one where periodic spoiling of these by cold will occur.
     
  5. OIC Vancouver

    OIC Vancouver New Member

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    Actually these same plants were happy all through two previous winters and are located next to the house facing south but
    shared from the direct sun through cedar branches. I think that using the 'wait a see' approach appeals to me best for the present.
     
  6. devon1149

    devon1149 Member

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    OIC Vancouver, I hope you don't mind me adding to your thread. My previously indestructible Nandia emerged from winter with some green leaves but everything else dead looking. Should I cut them to the ground or leave them and hope they regain their lushness?
     

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  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Two years is not much of a trial. And apparently the characteristics of the planting site did not spare them either - the deciding factor remains that they did in fact get hit by cold there last month. So, you can expect more of same in future. With how often this happens being unpredictable - individual winters with significant lows can be decades apart or they can come in clusters.
     
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  8. devon1149

    devon1149 Member

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    Thanks for the reply, Ron. I may have missed something but I'm not sure what you mean about two years not being much of a trial. I have 7 nandina that were planted 12 years ago and have always been very healthy. I understand climate change and unpredictable weather. I just wanted to know whether I should hard prune them.
     
  9. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    You mentioned two previous winters, since there was nothing remarkable about them that I am recalling I thought you were indicating that was how long the planting had been present. And I have heard or read other individuals state that short term survival of various kinds of plants had demonstrated long term hardiness of them many times. So, coming from that background experience I thought you were saying that because they had not frozen back in the two previous years it had been shown that they were proven on your site. Anyway, if the root crowns are still live new tops will appear this summer (a white berried form I had going at a friend's place in Island County, Washington did not come back from the roots after freezing to the ground one time - apparently this species does sometimes freeze out entirely in our region. Despite proximity of salt water, which the planting site for the white berried plant had minutes away by car in two directions).
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2022
  10. devon1149

    devon1149 Member

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    Ah, I understand the confusion - I'm not the OP. Thanks for the info.
     
  11. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I said I'd check out the ones near me. These are the nicest-looking, but all the ones I'm seeing look better than what people are asking about here.
    Nandina-domestica_ChilcoNelson_Cutler_20220313_130508.jpg Nandina-domestica_ChilcoNelson_Cutler_20220313_130532.jpg
     

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