Haworthia, Aloe or Gasteria?

Discussion in 'Cacti and Succulents' started by Kat87, Jul 13, 2021.

  1. Kat87

    Kat87 New Member

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    Hi everyone!

    After extensive online research and receiving conflicting information from local nurseries, I'm stumped at successfully identifying this plant!

    I don't believe this is a Haworthia, as it has serrated leaves and the warts don't resemble stripes.

    The structure of the leaves mirror closely the look of the Lace Aloe (Aristaloe aristata), but my plant doesn't seem to have the abundance of leaves.

    A local nursery first stated that it was a Haworthia, and once I mentioned the jagged edges, said that it was a Gasteria. Upon researching, however, it was said that they do not have spiky leaves, and are known for their rounded leaves - not pointed.

    So, I am thoroughly confused! Is this a hybrid of some form, or have I not found a reliable online source?

    Any help would be immensely appreciated!!

    Thank you for your time!
     

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  2. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    The page at The Difference Between Aloe and Haworthia - Sublime Succulents says Haworthia do not have teeth along the edges. The pages that show Haworthia and Haworthiopsis indicate that the white markings on the leaves are tubercules, whereas on your plant they don't appear to be raised, just coloured markings. Once it flowers, it is supposed to be more clear, with Haworthia having white flowers.

    There is also an intergeneric hybrid called xGasteraloe. It is described at
    Gasteraloe 'Flow' | World of Succulents (pages that are set up so you can't copy text are so annoying). It's Gasteria carinata var. verrucosa and some unknown aloe.

    Isn't your plant quite young to reject that ID based on the number of leaves? If it's that, it looks like it should get orange flowers. Well, there aren't enough photos to be sure how the xGasteraloe flowers would differ.
     
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  3. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Wow, Wendy. I'm continually impressed by how much you know about so many plants!
     
  4. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I didn't know anything about them, except that I had a little Haworthia for many years. You can be impressed that I was interested enough to look them up. You could be more impressed if I were able to remember anything I spend all this time looking up.
     
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  5. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Like me, you probably wish you remembered everything you ever heard or ever learned about plants. We'd be walking encyclopedias! (Whatever encyclopedias may be.)

    I'm still impressed by what you have retained, so please don't argue.
     
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  6. Kat87

    Kat87 New Member

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    Thank you so much for taking the time to respond to my post!

    In regards to the flowers, my plant sprouted a very long stem with several buds a couple of months ago. However, they wilted and died before they bloomed. All I could make out from their appearance was that they were probably about a half inch in length, and more of a rosy-coral color. This was one of the reasons why I wanted to find out what type of plant I have, because I'm clearly doing something wrong if the plant wasn't thriving enough to allow the buds to thrive.

    That's my philosophy, at least. I'm very new to the world of plants, so I only know the bare minimum. I'm trying to learn as I go. I currently have all of my succulents in my kitchen windowsill, as that is the best window I have to receive bright, indirect sunlight. I live in NY (I'm a southern transplant). Between my lack of expertise and unfamiliarity with the finicky weather of the north, I wouldn't venture out to say I have the best conditions to be a successful plant owner, but I'm trying!

    Getting back to your reply, I agree that many of the white markings on my plant are simply color. However, there are some that are raised, just not nearly as distinguished as my haworthia 'Twist.'

    I share your sentiment about pages that don't allow one to copy text! Thank you for sharing the link so that I can explore this further.

    I'm going to guess by your wording that, indeed, my plant is too young to be able to judge its type by the number of leaves. I was trying to learn more about how they grow so that I would be able to make a better informed guess, but I was unsuccessful at finding such information. It could be that the flowers would have been orange had they survived the bloom, based on the color of their dead appearance. I will try to figure out what I'm doing wrong so that the next blooming season will be successful!

    Thank you again for your time and helpful feedback! I hope you have a wonderful day!

     

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