Harvested some voluntary Dill

Discussion in 'Fruit and Vegetable Gardening' started by Sulev, Jun 14, 2021.

  1. Sulev

    Sulev Well-Known Member

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    Yesterday I harvested few kilos of voluntary Dill from my strawberry and onion beds. I share this Dill to my friends who keep it in the freezer for cooking in the winter season.

    2021-06-14 16.20.01.jpg
     
    [rachael], AlainK and Acerholic like this.
  2. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Sharing each others surplus produce is so important. All local, well done Sulev.
     
  3. AlainK

    AlainK Generous Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    I usually have some that germinates from the previous season each year, but none so far : I must plant some again.
    I love it with fish and sour cream...
    Nice garden you have up there ;0)
     
  4. AlainK

    AlainK Generous Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    It was the same with this variety of poppies I've seen in my late father's garden for decades. Lats year, there were none, but I found some seeds in an envelope dating 3 or 4 years back, sowed some at random and :

    papaver_210611a.jpg

    The seeds are no good for the traditional Easter cake my mother used to cook though, or that my uncle who was a baker and completed his apprenticeship at a Jewih baker in London would put on the knotted bread he made at the end of the week. I've never been able to knot five "strings" of bread, it's very technical...
     
  5. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I had to look it up. From Papaver somniferum - Wikipedia: "Papaver somniferum, commonly known as the opium poppy[2] or breadseed poppy,[3] is a species of flowering plant in the family Papaveraceae. It is the species of plant from which both opium and poppy seeds are derived and is also a valuable ornamental plant, grown in gardens".
     
  6. AlainK

    AlainK Generous Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    Yes, that's a form of Papaver somniferum.
    If you scar the "bulb" just after the petals have faded, there's white sap that you can gather to make opium, with the "plain" species or this one.
    Of course you don't want to.

    In the eighties, I went to see some remote family, my great-grand aunt that looked like a clone of my father's mother had some poppies. She told us that she was now limited by state rules : she would discard the rest of the plant when she had gathered the seeds, but people from the town would come and buy them. If you boil them, etc. you can make what they caleed "kompot", a cheap opium that was a plague rising in communist Poland.

    I have at least 5 plants that can be used as "psychotrops" in my garden. Personally, I enjoy them as garden flowers, or plants.
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    How was it determined that the seeds of this double form are no good for baking?
     
  8. AlainK

    AlainK Generous Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    My Mum and Dad tasted them.

    I trusted them.
     

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