Hamlin orange dying in louisiana

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by Mrburns, Apr 28, 2014.

  1. Mrburns

    Mrburns New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Baton Rouge
    I planted this tree last season and it did not produce any fruit. I planted it too close to fence so I trimmed it before winter because I wanted it to grow tall. After winter the top leaves died and it sprouted at the bottom. What do I do to save it? Cut the top? Thanks for your help.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    5,283
    Likes Received:
    296
    Location:
    Vancouver BC Canada
    The portion of the tree above the main branch appears to be dead based on the brown color of the bark. I'm guessing this is a grafted tree and that the new growth at the bottom is from the rootstock. Scratch the bark in the main stem at various points above the graft line to see if it's green underneath; there's still hope if there is. Otherwise you might choose to allow the rootstock to grow on then graft desirable varieties onto it. If the growth is above the graft line then you're good to go.
     
  3. Mrburns

    Mrburns New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Baton Rouge
    Is the growth above the graft. I don't know how to tell. Thanks.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Mrburns

    Mrburns New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Baton Rouge
    Another photo
     

    Attached Files:

  5. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    4,400
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Austin, Tx
  6. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    5,283
    Likes Received:
    296
    Location:
    Vancouver BC Canada
    It looks like you're in luck. The graft line can be seen in the second picture. Notice the difference in the color of the bark and more importantly the difference in composition of the leaves coming from each portion. The lower portion has trifoliate leaves; growth of this type should be removed. The upper portion is the Hamlin orange.
     
  7. Mrburns

    Mrburns New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Baton Rouge
    Awesome thanks. I have never added any fertilizer. Should I add some if so what kind. Also should I trim the top branches or trunk?
     
  8. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    4,400
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Austin, Tx
    Remove all the dead wood. Fertilization may be premature as you don't want to encourage lush growth that is more susceptible to freeze damage.
     
  9. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    5,283
    Likes Received:
    296
    Location:
    Vancouver BC Canada
    I've not dealt with this situation before. I suppose you would end up with a citrus bush if you were to remove the main stem above the new growth and left all or some of the growth to continue. However I wonder if there are other options if a significant portion of main stem is still alive.

    Regarding fertilization...this post in Question on feeding citrus | UBC Botanical Garden Forums (found by searching) may be of interest.

    @saltcedar
    Is freeze damage a concern at this time of year? Would there not be enough time for new growth to harden off prior to winter?
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2015
  10. Mrburns

    Mrburns New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Baton Rouge
    No risk of freeze this time of year we are in the high 80's and will stay there until early November. Thanks for all your help. My wife accused me of killing the tree because of over pruning so I have to save it.
     
  11. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    4,400
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Austin, Tx
    No chance of a freeze now but fertilization will cause a flush of new growth that may not fully harden off before next Winter. I'd let it grow slow this first *(recovery) year, then in 2015 feed it as prescribed.
    * Here in Central Texas where hard freezes regularly kill plants to the ground we can get triple the normal
    amount of vegetive new growth the first year after a freeze. That new wood may not sufficiently harden off before Winter. Any additional stimulus just makes it worse. It's called growing plants "hard" by not feeding or watering more than absolutely necessary.
     
  12. Mrburns

    Mrburns New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Baton Rouge
    Ok should I trim any besides the root growth or just leave it alone. Thanks for all your help.
     
  13. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    4,400
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Austin, Tx

Share This Page