Hagoromo Types Changing to Trifolate Leaf Structure

Discussion in 'Maples' started by timnichols, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. timnichols

    timnichols Active Member Maple Society

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    East Flat Rock, NC
    I have noticed a few different large specimen sessifolium leaf structured plants (Hagoromo & Koshimino) that have branches of leaves that have changed from the feather-like divided leaves to a single three-lobed leaf. I personally noticed the branch of feather-like leaf structures last year on one of the large specimens which has now changed to this three-lobed leaf on the same branch. The other large specimen actually belongs to a friend of mine that noticed this trifoliate type leaf for the first time this year. By trifoliate I do not mean mean a divided compound leaf, but a leaf structure with 3 leaf lobes similar to acer monspessulanum and some forms of acer buergerianum.

    Everything I have noticed is that this leaf-type switch happens to the entire branch of a Koshimino or Hagoromo. On both specimens, the branch that switched leaf structures had a diameter of at least 3 inches. I wish I had taken some photos of these trees or these leaf structures, but I was too awestruck. If this phenomenon continues next spring I may take photos, as I am sure the leaves are off these trees now.

    Has anyone else noticed this on any sessifolium leaf structured plant? Is this reversion? Does reversion happen on just new growth as I am familiar with in Butterfly and Beni shichihenge, or can old growth revert as it may appear on these trees? If anyone else has noticed this going on or has any thoughts on what is going on, please let me know!

    Thanks,

    Tim
     
  2. katsura

    katsura Active Member 10 Years

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    Tim,
    I will check my several sessifolium's tomorrow and reply though they do
    not have 3in diameter branches, but this is a fascinating observation and
    excellent questions about reversions.
    Thanks for the topics.
    Mike
     
  3. maf

    maf Well-Known Member Maple Society

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    I saw a 50 foot 'Hagoromo' this year that was maybe 80% reverted to palmate foliage, (all around the outside branches, the interior 20% or so was still Hagoromo-like), but among the 5-lobed palmate leaves was a noticeable number of 3-lobed ones. See this picture for example: 3-lobed leaves visible at 3 o'clock and 9 o'clock.

    Not sure if it is related to what you are seeing. One learned friend suggested it might simply be a grafted 'Hagoromo' that is reverting, but I am keeping an open mind and hope to visit the tree in the future to see what becomes of it.
     
  4. timnichols

    timnichols Active Member Maple Society

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    Mike,

    Thanks! I hope none of your trees are showing these characteristics, but let us know if you find any of this "reversion" on your sessifolium types. I am beginning to wonder if this has been cause by the abnormally warm summer this year.

    Tim




    Maf,

    Thanks for the photo and information! It looks like the 3 lobed leaves that you pointed out in the picture. This is very interesting because I was not aware of any reversion that might happen with sessifolium types. Do you know if the tree showed the sessifolium characteristics on the now "reverted" branches? I am interested to find out whether or not old growth "reverted" as opposed to new growth. It will also be interesting to watch these trees to see if they will return to their sessifolium habit within the next few years.

    Thanks,

    Tim
     
  5. katsura

    katsura Active Member 10 Years

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    Tim,
    I still have leaves (some green, some Fall color) on many of my maples and I looked at Hagoromo,
    Momenshide and Hazeroino late this afternoon and I saw NO trifoliate leaves just the feathery sessifolium
    form, but you have me so interested now in studying these sessifoliums that I plan to study their leaves
    much more carefully the next few days before they all blow away. My Hagoromo is probably 7-8 years old.
    I could not remember where my Koshimino is.
     
  6. NJACER

    NJACER Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Tim,

    I had the opportunity to take some pictures of my Hagoromo that we noticed the trifoliate leaf form on your visit this fall. I got out my orchard ladder and it appears that the entire tree has this type of leaf or all of the leaves on the tree that are still hanging on are the same three lobe types. I do not think that this would be considered a reversion but more of an unusual growth characteristic this year. I would think that a reversion would be to a typical palmate leaf and not this form.

    I purchase this cultivar from John Vermuelen and Sons as one of their stock plants in 1994. I am guessing it was about five to eight years old at that time so the tree is over 20 years old. The height is approximately 25 feet or 8 meters. We had over fifty maple enthusiast here in the spring for the gathering and I do not recall anyone noticing this leaf form on this cultivar. I checked the other sessifolium leaf plants in the garden and they all appear to have normal foliage. Next spring should be interesting.

    Ed
     

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  7. timnichols

    timnichols Active Member Maple Society

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    Ed,

    Thanks so much for taking some photos and adding input. I was at your maple gathering this spring and, as you know, the sessifolium type leaf structures catch my eye. I had scanned every sessifolium on your property including every seedling off of this tree. I clearly remember looking at base to the tips looking for brooms or sports. I can confirm that that the leaf appeared to be correct in form on May 15th. This is what fascinates me so much. I wonder if this wood is grafted, if it will continue it's trifoilate appearance or will it revert back to the original sessifolium appearance? I know that because of the drought, many trees did abnormal occurrences. Many shirasawanums were re-blooming a few weeks ago like it was spring again due to hormone fluctuation that occurs in droughts. Maybe this is something similar.

    Tim
     

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