Identification: Growths on fig tree

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by Weedbender, May 1, 2011.

  1. Weedbender

    Weedbender Active Member 10 Years

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    I brushed these off yesterday and they are back today. I only see them on my potted figs. Not the in-ground ones. Anyone know what they are?
     

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  2. lkailburn

    lkailburn Active Member

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    how large are your potted figs? that trunk looks large!! sorry i can't help on the issue, hope you figure it out.

    Thanks,

    -Luke
     
  3. Weedbender

    Weedbender Active Member 10 Years

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    1 1/2" in diameter.
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Adventitious roots? Lots of Ficus species produce them (F. benghalensis is famous for them) so it wouldn't be surprising if F. carica does too.
     
  5. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member 10 Years

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    While I have not seen this before, I think this is latex exuded from tiny insect damage on the trunk. This is still your spring. If you notice the extrusion has a stickier end nearest the trunk, kinda looks or feels like white household glue, then that's what it is. I believe you had a pretty cold winter with late frosts and snows. If this fig was kept in cold shelter, or outdoors with deep mulch, I'd expect some sort of weeping complaint. This is a new one to me, though.

    Those little aerial roots we discuss are only white at the very new tips when I've seen them, and the tips very definitely taper.
     
  6. Weedbender

    Weedbender Active Member 10 Years

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    Not roots. The slightest touch or breeze and they turn to powder. They do not leave a hole in the bark either. They are hollow. I saw this on them last spring also.
     
  7. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Some of the Cammilea fungi are similar, but I've never thought of them as a North American phenomenon.....
     
  8. Weedbender

    Weedbender Active Member 10 Years

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    Thanks Lorax.
    Do you know if they are harmful to the trees ?
     
  9. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    They don't seem to do any harm to the trees they grow on down here....
     
  10. Weedbender

    Weedbender Active Member 10 Years

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    Thank you.
    I just sprayed the trunks with Fruit Tree spray to see if that stops them or not.
     
  11. Weedbender

    Weedbender Active Member 10 Years

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    Update.
    As of now, 4 out of 5 of the figs that had the fungus have died.
     
  12. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member 10 Years

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    Interesting. Do you think the fungus caused the death, or do you think the fungus followed a disease path that was already killing them?

    Did your inground figs die too? I'm guessing your total was five and you only have one remaining.
     
  13. Weedbender

    Weedbender Active Member 10 Years

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    None of my in ground figs showed any signs of this fungus. Only the potted figs.
    I'm not sure if some disease or weakness preceded the fungus. 2 of the 4 that died did so after being unpotted and replanted in the ground for about a month. Roots seemed to looked fine.
     

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