Greenhouse Tomatoes

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by MikeL, Jun 6, 2015.

  1. MikeL

    MikeL Member

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    The growth of my greenhouse tomato plants is prolific, however the fruit production is low and many flowers just fall off the plant. I first had a few screened sections to hopefully let bees in. This weekend, I removed all glass panels on the front section. What can I do to get more fruit?
     

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  2. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    You could try hand pollinating by shaking the flowers periodically. Commercial growers sometimes use electric vibrators to improve pollination in greenhouses, but bumblebees are also used. For a small greenhouse shaking should be adequate.
     
  3. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Last edited: Nov 3, 2015
  4. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

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    Also remove all of the lower foliage (below the first set of blooms), these large branchlets only deter from developing large and abundant fruit set. And continue to prune these "leaves" over the course of the growing season… for a visual...imagine having just leaves at the very top of the plant, and a long bare stock with the fruit below…. see Windset in Ladner......
     
  5. TheScarletPrince

    TheScarletPrince Member

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    Thanks for the tip!
     
  6. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    Pruning Tomatoes is a matter of personal preference. I have never seen more abundant and better quality tomato crop than in this (unpruned) garden: http://kootenaygardening.com/garden_vegetable_heirloom.htm
     
  7. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    I agree with Sundrop. I only prune off the leaves that are below the lowest fruiting spur with unripe tomatoes, my reasoning being that the more leaves on the plant, the more sugar produced by photosynthesis for fruit ripening. This tactic always yields a good crop, although I haven't tried anything scientific, like a side-by-side comparison with pruned plants. I only do this limited pruning for staked tomatoes. The indeterminate ones in cages are not pruned at all.
     

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