Identification: green spreading thing from sand to soil?

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Yvonjovi, Apr 9, 2020.

  1. Yvonjovi

    Yvonjovi New Member

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    Sidney BC
    Hello,
    I have researched fungus, lichen and 'slime' and am having trouble finding this little grower! Help!
    It started out on a sandy growing medium around my rock stepping stones and continues to migrate (from last year) into the adjoining soil beds.
    From the photo, it's small, there is a fir needle (lower right edge) in the photo to give size.
    It's growing in a mass, some of the mass got broken up with a shovel while turning the bed over.
    It looks nefarious to me but I'll keep an open mind as all creatures deserve love.
    Thanks for any help!
    IMG_4848.JPG
     
    togata57 and Sundrop like this.
  2. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    This is a liverwort, a kind of bryophyte, a non-vascular plant.

    I am not a bryophyte person, but this appears to be a sizeable liverwort compared to most, so possibilities include genera like Marchantia, Pellea.

    … I will reassign this to a plant-related forum as soon as I figure out which one would be best :-)
     
  3. Yvonjovi

    Yvonjovi New Member

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    Thanks. I've looked around in the moss liverwort now and see that it could be a green tongue liverwort? I do have a wet backyard and there is other big fluffy moss growing around it that appears to be flowering. I wouldn't have picked a moss but could not find any lichen that matched. This one is described as liking minerals which would make sense growing out of sand. Maybe it doesn't mind garden soil.
     
  4. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Liverwort can be a particular challenge in gardens. It can sometimes be found growing on soil that is compact, airless and moist for much of the year. It may be very difficult to get rid of but I have been somewhat successful with spraying it with vinegar and then covering with a light mulch. Boiling water is effective in removing it from hard surfaces like paving stones. I think liverwort is a fascinating plant - as long as it isn't growing in my garden.
     

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