grapefruit tree seedlings

Discussion in 'Citrus' started by 59joy, Jun 12, 2005.

  1. 59joy

    59joy Member

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    Hello, I recently started 2 grapefruit seeds which have given me 2 shoots per seed. Is this normal? I was expected one only. Should I split the seed and try for 2 trees? They are about 2 inches tall and have2 leaves per stem with a third starting on one stem on one of the seeds. What do you suggest? I was expecting one stem per seed that would, with a lot of luck, turn into a small stem and eventually a tree trunk. Any suggestions would be welcome. Happy gardening. Joyce
     
  2. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  3. Ralph Walton

    Ralph Walton Active Member 10 Years

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    There is a note in that thread about polyembrionic seeds in citrus which is pertinent to your question. In some citrus seeds there can be more than one embryo giving multiple shoots. One (usually the smaller one) will be the result of fertilization and will rarely grow true to type, while the other(s) will have developed asexually and should grow true. The problem of course is you won't know for sure, but as Eric said, you should choose one and allow it to grow out. They are completely separate plants, but there is little chance of separating them without damage.
    Ralph
     
  4. Megami

    Megami Active Member 10 Years

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    I planted a bunch of grapefruit seeds earlier this year, all of the ones that sprouted (about 10 came up) were regular one sprout per seed plants - except for one which sent up two shoots, and then ANOTHER two shoots a few days later. I've seen seeds sometimes shoot up smaller secondary shoots, and once with one of my mango seedlings it shot up 3 shoots from one seed, but I'd never seen a seed send up FOUR shoots when it was only supposed to have one.
     
  5. 59joy

    59joy Member

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    thanks for the info on grapefruit seedlings. My 3 seeds sprouted 2 each of identical size and leaf numbers. I will split 2 and leave one in tandum and see how they develope. They are pretty little plants so even if they dont do much they make an attractive houseplant.
    joy
     
  6. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Do you have a photo of the seeds that have
    more than one shoot? I'd like to see how
    many true leaves are on the shoots and see
    if you have enough root system to work
    with. If you have enough leaves on both
    shoots you can slice the seed vertically
    with a sterilized razor blade or very sharp
    knife and save both shoots from each seed
    if you have enough roots to support both
    plants individually.

    Jim
     
  7. astarr

    astarr New Member

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    hi, i'm so excited to have found this forum! I found a sprouted seed inside a white-fleshed grapefruit at the beginning of the summer and planted it to see if it would grow. it has grown about 3 inches and has 2 sets of nice dark shiny green leaves with another coming in. i have a few questions. 1) i'm in a very cold climate. where should i keep my little tree for the winter? should it be kept from drafts, or would it like to be kept near a window unless there are freezing cold temperatures? 2) should i feed it during the winter (i've been giving it diluted miracle grow once a month so far.) 3)if someday it produces fruit, will they resemble the orignial fruit from which the seeds came, or will the color, taste, and qulaity all be surprises? 4) do citrus trees grow well as stand-alone plants, or do they like company? thank you very much, --astarr
     
  8. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Welcome, astarr.

    Since you live in a cold area your tree will have to be brought indoors for the winter. Choose a location that will provide maximum light exposure and is free from drafts. Discontinue fertilizing and water the plant sparingly. The soil should be quick-draining; soggy soil will result in root rot.

    Your plant may eventually produce fruit when it matures; a ballpark figure of seven years, give or take, depending on growing conditions, is often mentioned. The fruit may not be of the same quality as that of the parent plant even if the seed is true to type. If you're interested in growing citrus for fruit production, you're better off buying a plant with the desired cultivar that has been grafted onto a rootstock.
    As an added benefit the tree will fruit much sooner, usually within a year or two. I have two seed-grown plants myself but decided to purchase some commerically grown ones earlier this year.

    I believe citrus, with the exception of some mandarin varieties, are self-fertilizing so your grapefruit tree can be grown alone.

    You may want to search these forums using the keyword 'citrus' for perhaps different takes on these questions. If you choose the purchase route, be aware that citrus varieties have different heat requirements for flower and fruit production.
     
  9. Grown from seeds out of a pink grapefruit bought in a supermarket last November. One year old and a flower has just come into bloom on my little 7" forest with another bud on the way.

    I wish I could post the scent that comes from just one flower, really heady and sweet, typical of all citrus.

    Compost was 50%loam, 40% organics and 10% old crushed mortar (not cement) put through a 6mm sieve. Seeds were just stuck in a pot about 20mm deep, kept watered and left to get on with it on a windowsill overwinter. Early summer they went into an unheated greenhouse but are back indoors for winter again. From 7 seeds I have 8 seedlings. One seed didn't germinate but 3 of the remaining 6 have been polyembrionic with two seedlings produced on each.

    I'm going to have to repot them into separate pots though as I think the compost is a bit tired now (slight touch of yellowing on the leaves) and they will also be fighting for space. Going by the above, some sacrifices will probably have to be made :(

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. drichard12

    drichard12 Active Member 10 Years

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    frogesque. Congratulations on your seed growing. Your seedlings look nice and healthy. I have about 2 dozen Clementine's started from seed, and are about six months old. I plan to use them for grafting and budding.

    Myself I have never tired Grapefruit seeds. But after viewing your posting and photos I plan to do so. Dale
     
  11. Spirros

    Spirros Member

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    I have a lemon seedling that sprouted almost a month ago... and it is still really really small - It looks almost exactly like it did when it first sprouted. The first true leaf appeared maybe a week or two after it sprouted but it has stayed very small this entire time. Do they usually do that? Is it just going to take a bit longer for it to kind of spring into action?
     
  12. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Spirros,
    Citrus typically alternate between root and top growth. Your seedling is likely putting its energy into developing its roots.
     
  13. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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