Gomphus bonarii

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by allelopath, Sep 18, 2006.

  1. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I found this in early August in the Sangre de Christos in northern New Mexico. I didn't know what it was. My first thought was I had found the first ever orange Sarcadon imbricatus (Hydnum imbricatum). I've just now identified it. Gomphus bonarii isn't mentioned in Mushrooms of Colorado, merits only a sentence in Mushroom's Demystified, but gets a half page with photo in North American Mushrooms (Miller & Miller). As far as edibility, M&M say that it can cause gastrointestinal upset in many people, so I'll pass. Nice to look at though.

    Note that the specimen on the right is much smaller and younger than those on the left.
     

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  2. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    This looks cool. Never seen this gompus, but i had gomphus clavatus and that caused some gastric upset big time.
     
  3. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I guess its rare in these parts. I found only this one clump of 4 in all my hiking.

    Gomphus clavatus gets a whole page in North American Mushrooms (Miller & Miller). Says its edible but some people experience gastric upset. That would be you. It won't be me. Thanks for sharing. :)
     
  4. ColoradoMushrooms

    ColoradoMushrooms Member

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    I found something similar here in southern colorado back in August. Everything I could dig up on it pointed me to Gomphus Kaufmanii (Western species). They look much like the Hydnum, but once you see the bottom they look like a rather large chantrelle. I have only seen one small patch of them. I grabbed this one for study, and left the rest.
     

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  5. Mycos

    Mycos Active Member

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    Gomphus

    That's very a interesting looking fungus indeed! And I don't blame you for getting a little excited thinking you may have found something unique. In my...what?... 35 years now of mushroom collecting and IDing, I've yet to lay eyes on that critter <g>


    Gary Williams
     
  6. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    My specimen may indeed be G. kaufmanii.What distinguishes G. kaufmanii and G. bonarii? According to Mushrooms Demystified and Mushrooms of Colorado, G. kaufmanii is up to 35 cm broad. My specimen, which looks full grown, is nowhere near that, 20 cm max.(point to G. bonarii) It goes on to describe the color of the caps: G. bonarii as duller, paler, cinnamon colored cap and G. kaufmanii as tan to brown to ochre-tawny cap. (point to G. kaufmanii)
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2006
  7. ColoradoMushrooms

    ColoradoMushrooms Member

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    G. Kauffmanii is considered the western species from what I have read. I'm sure G. bonarii is closely related, or probably the same.
     

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