Germination of Seeds

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by Knightwolf, Sep 22, 2005.

  1. Knightwolf

    Knightwolf Member

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    Hi,

    I'm new to tree growing and purchased some seeds from The Catalpa Tree Seed Company in New Jersey. I planted them on 09/07/05 and as of today 09/22/05 I have nothing sprouting. Does anybody know the germination period for the following seeds? I put them in a well drained plastic cup, vermicukite on the bottom, potting soil (seeds are approx 1/4-1/2" below surface) well moistened and saran wrap covering them. Any idea when I can expect them to germinate? Thanks for your help!!

    Eastern Whitebud - Alba Seeds - Cercis canadensis alba
    Banyan Tree (Ficus) Seeds - Ficus benghalensis
    Lemon Tree Seeds - Citrus limon
    Blood Orange Seeds - Citrus sinensis osbeck
    Weeping Willow Seeds - Salix babylonica
    Bing Cherry Seeds - Prunus avium
    Giant Sequoia Seeds - Sequoiadendron giganteum
    Bald Cypress - Taxodium distichum
     
  2. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hello Knightwolf,

    That is a big question. Germinating trees and shrubs is not generally as simple as germinating garden veggies or flowers. The Salix would probably germinate quickly, but others could take months (or years). Each plant has to be considered separately for germination time and procedure. Some seeds may need cool or warm treatments (called stratification) or may need to have hard seed coats softened or opened.

    Take a look at this webpage from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada:
    http://www.agr.gc.ca/pfra/shelterbelt/shbpub22.htm
     
  3. Honeysuckle

    Honeysuckle Active Member

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    Re: Growing cherry pits

    I had store-bought cherries (Bing or Ranier or some other common, red sweet cherry variety) and was curious what are the chances of being able to grow them from pits? Are store varieties sterile or can this be done with any hope of success - if they get a week to dry & two months in the fridge?
     
  4. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hello Honeysuckle,

    Planting seeds from fruit can be fun for experiment, but in most cases the plants will not be as good as those that have been selected by plant breeders. Out of the many plant crosses only a few really turn out to be good varieties. Note also that Texas does not have a good climate for growing cherries.

    It may be more worthwhile to try saving seeds from annuals like tomatoes or squash to see what type of plants can develop from the chance crosses.
     
  5. MikeJones

    MikeJones Member

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    The most succesful germination fo seeds is achieved in a most simeple way, which i have came up. Firs get a regular bottle like an aquafina bottle or or any clear 500 ml bottle. Insert the seeds into the bottle. Than get a paper towel and fold it couple of times so it can fit through the bottle hole. Place the nakin in the bottle over the seeds and insert water into the botle. Make sure the whole napkin gets moist. DO NOT OVERFILL. Close the bottle (so the paper doesnt get dry) tightly and leave it under light or a lamp for couple of days. Make sure that its warm and water is seen ont the top of the inside bottle as it has evaporated. Open the bottle every few days if needed. After few days, look under the bottle to see if the seeds has begu germinating. Trust me this works for any kind of seeds. After the have germinated cut the bottle open so you can take out the seeds without demaging them and put them into the soil.
     
  6. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Sorry. but no - this won't work for any kind of seeds. As ecological requirements for plant establishment varies, so does the requirements for germination. Some seeds require a treatment with smoke; others require an acid treatment; still others require physical scarring - and the list goes on.

    For many seeds, yes, your method will work - but the hoops one must jump through to figure out how to germinate many other kinds of seeds is legion.
     

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