Garden flowers

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by sjs, Jun 4, 2020.

  1. sjs

    sjs Member

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    Does anyone know what this plant is, it was purchased at a garden center with no label.

    It has fragrant leaves when you rub them, purple flowers. It kind of reminds me of rosemary.

    Also is this a perennial or annual
     

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  2. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    I think it's a French Lavender. Or a topped Lavender in the US.
     
  3. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Lavandula stoechas. It's a perennial, but can be somewhat tender.
     
  4. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    Without knowing your location it is not possible to say if it will survive winter in your gardening zone.
     
  5. sjs

    sjs Member

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    I'm located in Southern Ontario Canada, I think it was purchased at a Costco garden center

    Also I was surprised it's lavender because the smell didn't remind me of lavender at all. At least not very much like the commercial lavebdar used to fragrance products
     
  6. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    According to information on the Net Lavandula stoechas is winter hardy in USDA plant hardiness zones 7 and above. Here is Ontario Interactive Plant Hardiness Zone Map where you can find in which zone you are in. In zones slightly below 7 it may survive milder winters, too.
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Two points about hardiness zone designations. First, in practice the lowest zone indicated for a plant will tend to be where it is on the border of hardiness. Which in practical terms means part of the time it will be damaged within that zone. Second, there is a widespread tendency to not assign the correct zones, to rate plants too highly. Because of a misunderstanding of what the USDA zones stand for. So for instance in the case of giving USDA 7 for Lavandula stoechas it might be that it has been seen to burn at 10 degrees F. With a conclusion being reached therefore that the plant is "hardy to USDA 7". Because the temperature spread given by the USDA for Zone 7 is 0-10 degrees F. Never mind that that spread indicates the average annual minimum temperature range for Zone 7. Which means that some years it will be below 0 in some Zone 7 locations. In other words well below 10 degrees.
     

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