Identification: Fungus or lichen growing on a Western Red Cedar (PNW)

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by chickadees, Dec 31, 2019.

  1. chickadees

    chickadees New Member

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    Any ideas what this is? It doesn't look like any lichens I'm familiar with. The tree seems to be healthy other than this growth. No sign of mushrooms other than what can be seen in these photos.

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  2. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi @chickadees

    This appears to be the fruiting body of a crustose fungi rather than a lichen.

    I've been spending time this week working on crustose fungi identification so I can tell you with confidence ... that it is hard to get IDs for crustose :-).
    However, if you would take a closer up photo of the area on the branch underside, I can give it a whirl: It look like slight pileate formation there which may help. Also, I can't see the surface clearly at this distance: Am wondering if the centre is merulioid which if it is would help narrow ID.
    Red Cedar substrate may also help narrow things, as that is less usual.

    Cheers!
     
  3. chickadees

    chickadees New Member

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    Thanks for taking a look! Here are closeups of the stem.

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  4. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Thank you for the closeups @chickadees! I was hoping to luck out, to have this be one of the crusts I have already been reviewing, but no.
    So ... while I plod through the PNW crusts, I will keep these images in mind, so you might not hear back from me quickly.
    ... also important to note that some crusts require microscopy for accurate ID.

    There is of course a chance that this could be immediately familiar to a plant pathologist - particularly if it is specifically a red cedar associate. You could share the link to this thread in a post in the Conifers subforum here, in case there are any plant pathologists familiar with this?
     

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