Identification: Fungus needs identifying please.

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by Heather Rankin, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. Heather Rankin

    Heather Rankin Member

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    Hi,

    This fungus was found by the sidewalk in Central Richmond recently. Would it be Monkey Tail?

    Thank you.

    Heather
     

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  2. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    Yes, some variety of what is called Turkey Tail.
     
  3. Heather Rankin

    Heather Rankin Member

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    Hi MycoRob,

    Many thanks for your input. I wonder what the exact variety might be. I'm sure a local expert knows. They just have to see this post! :) I thought it would be easy to pinpoint on the internet, but apparently not.

    Heather
     
  4. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    This one is Trametes versicolor.
     
  5. Heather Rankin

    Heather Rankin Member

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    Hi MycoRob,

    Thank you, once again. I don't recall having seen it anywhere before, but now that I've seen it once, I'll probably notice it elsewhere. I wonder now whether it's common or rare.

    Heather
     
  6. Harri Harmaja

    Harri Harmaja Active Member 10 Years

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    The fruit bodies appear quite thin. This would suggest a Stereum (S. ostrea or S. subtomentosum). We should know whether the lower surface (the hymenium) of the basidiocarp is smooth or beset with small pores.

    Cheers,

    Harri Harmaja
    http://www.luomus.fi/users/harmaja/index.htm
     
  7. Heather Rankin

    Heather Rankin Member

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    Hi Harri,

    I returned to the wood stump site this morning and tried to photograph the underside without success. It was too difficult to access. I carefully took a small piece and sure enough, the lower surface of the basidiocarp, although smooth, was beset (handy little word) with small pores that were more apparent under a 10X eyeglass. I take it then that it is Stereum subtomentosum a true Turkey Tail/Shelf Mushroom?

    I thank you very much for your input. I can now read up more about it on the internet.

    I clicked on your website link and just loved the sound of those birds. Your bio. is amazing! I'll check your site out more later.

    Cheers,

    Heather
     
  8. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi Heather,

    Turkey Tails (Trametes genus) have pores on the underside. Members of the Stereum genus have an underside that appears smooth.

    cheers,
    -frog
     
  9. Heather Rankin

    Heather Rankin Member

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    Hi "Frog",

    The fungus definitely has what appears to be hundreds of "pin-pricked" indentations on its underside evenly spaced. The piece I broke off was an approx. 1" complete "fan shape" and it measured exactly 5/32" thick – measured with calipers. So it is Trametes versicolour as MycoRob said?

    Are there many different Turkey Tails in BC? Do you know what one is particularly common here on the Lower Mainland. In this rainforest area, I would imagine that there must be a variety of Turkey Tails, but I know zero about fungus. It caught my eye and I had to photograph it as I thought it was extraordinarily beautiful. I also think frogs are, though no one I know agrees with me! :)

    Many thanks,

    Heather
     
  10. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Good question!

    There are ~18 Turkey tails in North America* and at least 4 of them in the Pacific Northwest**.

    "Turkey Tail" is typically used to refer to the species Trametes versicolor, but is also used sometimes to refer to the whole Trametes genus.

    There are also a few similar looking mushrooms; I've been on the lookout for Cerrena, whose pores are apparently usually broken up/connected/daedeloid, sometimes looking almost tooth-like.

    ... and pleased that you like frogs :-)

    -frog

    *described in Gilbertson&Ryvarden NA Polypores, 1987. This number may have since changed.
    **PNW Key Council Polypore key
     
  11. Heather Rankin

    Heather Rankin Member

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    Thank you for your rapid response. 18 Turkey Tails! I'll be on the lookout now for the other three kinds in the PNW.

    Are they evenly spread, or is one type more common than another depending on the kinds of tree stumps they grow on?

    If I ever come across Cerrena, I'll let you know.

    Are Turkey Tails peculiar to N. America then?

    Frogs have taken a real beating these days. I rarely see any, but that's a topic for another forum! :)
     
  12. Heather Rankin

    Heather Rankin Member

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  13. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Thank you for sharing that - I too find the medicinal qualities of fungi interesting!

    Trametes is the name in current acceptance, Coriolus is an older name, but you never know, these things can change and frequently do.

    - frog
     
  14. Heather Rankin

    Heather Rankin Member

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    Hello again Frog,

    So Coriolus is an older name. Thank you.

    I have often thought that the cures for 90% plus of diseases could probably be found amongst the flora of the world except we simply haven't discovered or studied the specimens yet.

    When I hear e.g. of the rainforests being destroyed, I cringe when I think of how much potentially has been lost forever that might have led to cures for diseases. We likely have that same potential amongst the flora growing in our own locale, there waiting to be studied. I am pleased to see that Tramates has been studied.

    Heather
     

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