Identification: Fungi from the Mapple Ridge area

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by pascal, Oct 17, 2014.

  1. pascal

    pascal Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Hello,

    I have photographed these fungi in the Mapple Ridge area last year and have some problems IDing them.
    If anybody has a clue for some of them (even the genus alone would help):
    1.jpg

    2.jpg

    3.jpg
    1a,b: Lepista saeva (nuda) presumably same species?
    2a,b: Russula ...?
    3: Mycena interrupta ?
    4: Cortinarius iodes or traganus ?
    5: ?
    6: Photiota squarrosa (?)

    Thanks!
     
  2. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    2,135
    Likes Received:
    260
    Location:
    B.C., Canada
    Hi Pascal,

    2. Probably Russula brevipes or similar
    3. Looks like a Mycena but not one I'm familiar with. Lovely! Was it on ground?
    4. You are in the right Cortinarius group, but there are several of the light purple Corts and you would need to have the specimen in hand for an ID.
    5. and 6. Both look like Armillarias to me: Were they white spored? Was there any yellow in #6?

    cheers!
    frog
     
  3. pascal

    pascal Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Hi Frog,

    Thanks for taking the time to look and comment.

    3. Yes, both specimens were on the ground but there could have been dead wood just underneath the needles. The color was indeed amazing. Mycena interrupta distribution is described in Wikipedia as "Gondwanan distribution pattern, being found in Australia, New Zealand, New Caledonia [1] and Chile.[2] In Australia it is found in Victoria, Tasmania, New South Wales, and South Australia,[3] and in Queensland where its distribution is limited to Lamington National Park".
    I haven't found any ref. for a blue Mycena in North America.

    5 and 6. I agree for Armillarias. I didn't make any spore print (I didn't collect them). So maybe Armillaria nabsnona for 5. and Armillaria mellea for 6 then (I don't see any yellow tinge on the original photograph for that one).

    cheers!

    Pascal
     
  4. Geastrum

    Geastrum Active Member

    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wyoming, USA
    #6 Armillaria solidipes could be a better possibility--A. mellea has a smooth cap surface.
     
  5. pascal

    pascal Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver
    You may have nailed it, thanks.

    It seems that young mellea may have a textured cap as well:
    Armarilla mellea (Institució Catalana d’Història Natural)
    ... but the color is different and solidipes seems closer.

    tough to ID young specimens from a single photograph.
     
  6. pascal

    pascal Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver
    1b could be Cortinarius campheratus?
    1a possibly same, but attacked by a mycoparasite?
     

Share This Page