Frozen Indoor Plants

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by pirhan, Mar 9, 2009.

  1. pirhan

    pirhan Active Member

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    Hi there,

    I just moved from BC to Ontario and I took all (25 in total) my plants with me. They rode in the back of the SUV during the trip. Unfortunately, living in BC for nearly ten years I have grown out of touch with "winter" and, it dropped below 0 during my trip.

    I didn't take the plants into the hotel with me as I didn't think it'd get that cold (as well it would be many trips to get them all). After the cold we awoke to very grey and lifeless plants in the truck.

    Nearly all of them have perished. The leaves and stems were soggy and grey. My ficus (weeping fig) came out fairly decently - he's very droopy but the leaves still seem firm as well as the stems. He's just really really droopy and is looking a bit worse each day.

    What things can I do to ensure that my ficus comes back?

    As for the other plants - I cut off all the soggy dead mess and felt around at the roots. The roots all were firm. I separated some of the roots and put them in this plant cutting goop (found at Canadian Tire in pudding single cups). I still have all the other roots still in the soil.

    Any suggestions, tips, advice that I can do with either the goop or the still potbound roots?

    I got some Muskie (organic fish emulsion also found at Canadian Tire) put haven't watered the plants yet. Will this perk them up?

    I apologize for the novel and would appreciate any insights that could be given. I feel very bad that this has happened to my plants.

    Cheers,
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Yes: frozen tropical plants are dead plants. True tropicals can't even take temperatures below 50 degrees F. The "cutting goop" is probably for promoting rooting of stem cuttings and would have no applicability to current situation. What does the label say? If you are sticking the frosted roots in undiluted concentrate that will not help them all. Neither will fertilizing. Fertilizing only corrects nutrient deficiencies - and only then when the right formulation for the specific deficiency is chosen.
     
  3. pirhan

    pirhan Active Member

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    Hi there,

    I would of replied earlier, but this move has not been a kind one. It's probably better that I waited because I do have news on my plants. The plants I "gooped" have new growth. My monstera has not only beaten the odds, but have beaten them twice. He has two new shoots from the goop bit and he's grown a new bud from the bit I left in the dirt. My ficus roots are strong and there's new growth on the main trunk. I have a few other unidentified plants that have growths on them. My pothos is doing well. So is my christmas cactus.

    To give you an idea of the carnage:
    This is what the plants looked liked prior to the trip, in BC.

    This is what they looked like in Ottawa. In Brandon, Manitoba, the temperature reached below zero. The water in my bamboo plant was frozen on top. (More and another.)

    New growth on the monstera (Mo). "Goop" grown Mo.

    Pothos. Mystery plants. Mr. Figs. Another mystery plants. Newly potted. Jasmine plant seemed unaffected.

    So, all in all, these tropical plants are troopers. I think the stuff I got at Canadian Tire was a really good choice - the growth on Mo (the monstera) is completely phenomenal. The growth of the root system and the two stalks was done in just over a month. I am so happy as Mo was the first plant of my adult life and I've had him for seven years.

    I am sorry for bumping this up, but I wished to share my success with my frosty plants. I wish I knew what the goop was called (there are two goop containers in the "potted" picture). Please don't give up on plants that look like they're gone - talk to them and nurture them and they just might surprise you!
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Good to see the success!
     
  5. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

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    If the roots aren't damaged in a freeze, or frost, there is a good chance you'll eventually see new life.
    Glad things are looking better!
     

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